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I have 2 different sized structs and I would like to have one function in which I can pass them into. However, I do not know how to define the argument of the function to accept 2 different structs.

My structs are below

struct {
    int a;             // 2 byte
    int b;             // 2 byte
    int c;             // 2 byte
    int d;             // 2 byte
}  person1;                // 8 bytes


struct {
    int a;            // 2 byte
    DeviceAddress b;  // 8 bytes
    int c             // 2 bytes
    float d;      // 4 bytes
}  person2;               // 16 bytes

function print_struct(struct& ?????)
{
     actions here....
}


print_struct(person1);
print_struct(person2);
share|improve this question
2  
What you are trying to do is not possible in C. Can you please describe the actual problem you are trying to solve with this proposed solution? We will be happy to suggest alternative solutions to your problem. –  Code-Apprentice Jan 14 '13 at 18:21
    
You're using some C++-like syntax there - are you sure you want to tag this [C]? –  Carl Norum Jan 14 '13 at 18:24
    
Rememeber to choose an answer please. –  Adrián Jan 14 '13 at 18:40

4 Answers 4

Unfortunately, the only choice for unrelated structures in C is to pass pointers to the structures untyped (i.e. as void*), and pass the type "on the side", like this:

struct person1_t {
    int a;             // 2 byte
    int b;             // 2 byte
    int c;             // 2 byte
    int d;             // 2 byte
}  person1;

struct person2_t {
    int a;            // 2 byte
    DeviceAddress b;  // 8 bytes
    int c             // 2 bytes
    float d;      // 4 bytes
}  person2;

void print_struct(void* ptr, int structKind) {
    switch (structKind) {
        case 1:
            struct person1 *p1 = (struct person1_t*)ptr;
            // Print p1->a, p1->b, and so on
            break;
        case 2:
            struct person2 *p2 = (struct person2_t*)ptr;
            // Print p2->a, p2->b, and so on
            break;
    }
}

print_struct(&person1, 1);
print_struct(&person2, 2);

This approach is highly error-prone, though, because the compiler cannot do type checking for you.

share|improve this answer
    
"Unfortunately, the only choice in C is to pass pointers to the structures untyped (i.e. as void*), and pass the type "on the side"" Not true. –  Adrián Jan 14 '13 at 18:44
    
@AdriánLópez What's "not true" about it? If the structures are not related, there is no type-safe way of doing it. You have to make them related somehow; your solution is one way. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 14 '13 at 18:46
    
If the structs aren't related there's no reason for intending to implement somthing like this. Anyway, I think it can be done with an enun-union-struct combination. Check my solution to know what I mean. –  Adrián Jan 14 '13 at 18:48
    
@AdriánLópez "If the structs aren't related there's no reason for intending to implement somthing like this." That is not up to us to decide: the OP may have other reasons to do it this way. I did check your solution, and noted where exactly it diverges from the OP's intentions. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 14 '13 at 18:54

It's not really possible. You could create a union that holds the two structs plus some kind of identifier. You then pass the union in and use the identifier to work out which struct is contained in it.

typedef struct sp1 {
    int a;             // 2 byte
    int b;             // 2 byte
    int c;             // 2 byte
    int d;             // 2 byte
}  person1_t;          // 8 bytes


typedef struct sp2 {
    int a;            // 2 byte
    DeviceAddress b;  // 8 bytes
    int c             // 2 bytes
    float d;          // 4 bytes
}  person2_t;         // 16 bytes

typedef union {
    person1_t person1;
    person2_t person2;
} people;

function print_struct(people *p, int id) // e.g. id == 1, struct is person1
{
    switch (id)
    {
         case 1: // Do person 1 things
         break;

         case 2: // Do person 2 things
         break;

         default: // Error
         break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your solution does not work for the OP's question, when person1 and person2 are declared separately. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 14 '13 at 18:48
1  
Well it didn't look much like he knew he couldn't do what he wanted. This is a potential solution and since we don't know the rest of the framework he's working in it seemed preferable to a void *. We don't know it's a requirement for them to be separate. –  Joe Jan 14 '13 at 18:51

As dasblinkenlight put it, if you wanted to be able to pass two different structs into the functions, using void * to pass a generic pointer would be the way to go, however, doing so is not type safe and could easily lead to error-prone code.

What functionality are you trying to achieve by having two separate structs? You could consider combining the information into a single struct instead, and having a print function that prints out all non zero values?

Forgive the perhaps non-optimal c code, I am far from an expert, this is just to illustrate the point :)

typedef struct datastruct {
    int a;
    int b;
    float c;
} datastruct;

void printData(datastruct *d){

    printf("Data:\n")
    printf((d->a) ? "a=%d", a : "");
    printf((d->b) ? "b=%d", b : "");
    printf((d->c) ? "c=%.2f", c : "");
    printf("\n");
}

int main(void) {

    datastruct data = {0};
    /* now set values as needed */

    printData(&data);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
typedef struct p1 {
    int a;             // 2 byte
    int b;             // 2 byte
    int c;             // 2 byte
    int d;             // 2 byte
} person1;                // 8 bytes


typedef struct p2{
    int a;            // 2 byte
    DeviceAddress b;  // 8 bytes
    int c             // 2 bytes
    float d;      // 4 bytes
} person2;               // 16 bytes

typedef enum ptypes {
    PERSON1,
    PERSON2
} person_type;

typedef union p1_or_p2 {
    person1 p1;
    person2 p2;
} person1_or_person2;

typedef struct p {
    person1_or_person2 person;
    person_type type;
} person;

// Creating a person struct variable:
person p;
person1 p1;
p1.a = 5;
p1.b = 2;
p.type = PERSON1;
p.person = (person1_or_person2) p1;

void print_struct(person p) {
     switch (p.type) {
        case PERSON1:
            // actions for person1 here....
              // you can access person1 like this:
                 p.person.p1;
        break;
        case PERSON2:
            // actions for person2 here....
              // you can access person2 like this:
                 p.person.p2;
        break;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that your solution does not work for the OP's question, when person1 and person2 are declared separately. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 14 '13 at 18:47
    
What? How does it not work? They are still declared separately, just wrapped inside a struct which can be easly extended adding another element to the enum and de union. –  Adrián Jan 14 '13 at 18:49
    
The person variable is disconnected from both person1 variable and the person2 variable that the OP's question is using. Your solution forces the OP to do all manipulations with person1 and person2 through the person, essentially making his original two variables irrelevant. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 14 '13 at 18:52

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