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What would be the most convenient way to create a class which instances' attributes can't be changed from outside the class (you could still get the value), so it'd be possible to call self.var = v inside the class' methods, but not ClassObject().var = v outside of the class?

I've tried messing with __setattr__() but if I override it, the name attribute cannot be initiated in the __init__() method. Only way would be to override __setattr__() and use object.__setattr__(), which I am doing at the moment:

class MyClass(object):
    def __init__(self, name):
        object.__setattr__(self, "name", name)
    def my_method(self):
        object.__setattr__(self, "name", self.name + "+")
    def __setattr__(self, attr, value):
        raise Exception("Usage restricted")

Now this solution works, and it's enough, but I was wondering if there's even a better solution. The problem with this one is: I can still call object.__setattr__(MyClass("foo"), "name", "foo_name") from anywhere outside the class.

Is there any way to totally prevent setting the variable to anything from outside of the class?

EDIT: Stupid me not mentioning I'm not looking for property here, some of you already answered it, however it's not enough for me since it will leave self._name changeable.

share|improve this question
3  
Nope, there is not. Not in pure Python, in any case. Why do you need this? – Martijn Pieters Jan 14 '13 at 18:25
1  
Not possible, but it's worth asking why you would even want to do something like that? – mgilson Jan 14 '13 at 18:26
    
Maybe I need a read-only attribute. One decent example would be STEAM_ID, incase you people have used steam. – user1632861 Jan 14 '13 at 18:46
    
No, you don't need a read-only attribute. There is never (and I really mean that) any reason to totally prevent setting an attribute. Using @property will signal that you aren't supposed to do that, and that is all the "protection" you will ever need. – Lennart Regebro Jan 15 '13 at 10:16
    
If you've never needed one, it doesn't mean anyone else wouldn't ever need it. I do, and if you disagree, you don't know enough. – user1632861 Jan 15 '13 at 11:10
up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, you cannot do this in pure python.

You can use properties to mark your attributes as read-only though; using underscore-prefixed 'private' attributes instead:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self._spam = value

    @property
    def spam(self):
        return self._spam

The above code only specifies a getter for the property; Python will not let you set a value for Foo().spam now:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     def __init__(self, value):
...         self._spam = value
...     @property
...     def spam(self):
...         return self._spam
... 
>>> f = Foo('eggs')
>>> f.spam
'eggs'
>>> f.spam = 'ham'
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: can't set attribute

Of course, you can still access the 'private' _spam attribute from outside:

>>> f._spam
'eggs'
>>> f._spam = 'ham'
>>> f.spam
'ham'

You could use the double underscore convention, where attribute names with __ at the start (but not at the end!) are renamed on compilation. This is not meant for making a attribute inaccessible from the outside, it's intent is to protect an attribute from being overwritten by a subclass instead.

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.__spam = value

    @property
    def spam(self):
        return self.__spam

You can still access those attributes:

>>> f = Foo('eggs')
>>> f.spam
'eggs'
>>> f.__spam
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'Foo' object has no attribute '__spam'
>>> f._Foo__spam
'eggs'
>>> f._Foo__spam = 'ham'
>>> f.spam
'ham'
share|improve this answer
    
Not looking for property, but since you also answered that it cannot be done and someone else might be looking for property, I'll just accept your answer. – user1632861 Jan 14 '13 at 18:43

There is no strict way of doing encapsulation on Python. The best you can do is prepend 2 underscores __ to the intended to be private attributes. This will cause them to be mangled with the class name (_ClassName_AttribName), so if you try to use them on an inherited class, the base member won't be referenced. The names are not mangled if you use getattrib() or setattrib() though.

You can also override __dir()__ in order to hide them.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your answer too, I could've accepted this one just as well, and gave you an upvote! – user1632861 Jan 14 '13 at 18:45

You can use properties to simulate such a behavior but like Martijn said, it'll be possible to access the variable directly. Doing this is a signal of you not understanding Python philosophy, check this out.

Why Python is not full object-oriented?

The properties way:

http://docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#property

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    def getx(self):
        return self._x
    def setx(self, value):
        raise Exception("Usage restricted")
    x = property(getx, setx)
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't do what the OP asked for. – Ethan Furman Jan 14 '13 at 19:34
    
Actually what OP wants is not possible in python, at least not following the zen. – Manuel Gutierrez Jan 14 '13 at 21:55
    
Yes, I know. The way the answer is presented makes it seem like it is possible, which is why I down-voted. If you make the 'not possible' point in your answer I'll remove my down-vote. – Ethan Furman Jan 14 '13 at 23:11

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