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Anybody with experience in using graph db with complex traversal? AND use it from Erlang? Advantages? Small print?

It seems that default choice is neo4j for some reason.

I like Phoebus (distributed graph querying in Erlang, based on Google's Pregel algorithm), but it seems to be abandonware..

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Have a look at OrientDB which is a good alternative to Neo4J. OrientDB is fully open-source, contrary to Neo4J which has a commercial license. Also, OrientDB supports the standard blueprints API and is based on RB-Tree algorithms that are very well performing for various graph use-cases.

What most of the graph databases have in common is that they scale up only. They can scale-out, although as read-only instances in general. This means that if your amount of data is excessive you will need a very large server as well ( memory and storage ).

A distributed graph alternative is Titan. Titan is a distributed graph database, which I believe is based on Hadoop. Titan is designed to scale-out and can offer an interesting approach for massive paralelism, with some overhead. There are use cases where this is more appropriate, such as similar to Google Pregel use cases.

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you can represent a graph in an RDF database like Stardog. There should be some off the shelf code out there for doing SPARQL queries using erlang.

Wikipedia has a pretty nice list of triple stores.

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hmm aren't "direct" graph representation dbs like Neo4J more convenient/capable? I'm not interested in RDF/Semantic Web, it's more like FOAFD (Friend of a Friend's Dog) –  mrkafk Jan 15 '13 at 14:20
    
this post might interest you. stackoverflow.com/questions/4974243/… –  ERR0 Jan 18 '13 at 19:21
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