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Can CSS be used to make a left and right edges of a content container look like this image? I have been trying to figure out a way to do this without using an image, if that is possible.

image of left and right borders

Here is jsFiddle that I have been working on. The CSS for the "top" class never gets applied. The CSS for the "bottom" class seems to work ok though.

http://jsfiddle.net/kXuQY/

HTML:

<div class="drop-shadow top bottom">
  Content here.
</div>

CSS:

.drop-shadow {
/** Create container.  Box-shadow here is to color the inside of the container **/
 position:relative;
 width:50%;
 background: none repeat scroll 0 0 #FFFFFF;
 box-shadow: 0 1px 4px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3), 0 0 40px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1) inset;
 padding:3em;
 margin: 2em 20px 4em;
 text-align:center
}

.top:before,
.top:after {
  /** Generate pseudo-elements ('before' and 'after') and push them behind the container box. Position pseudo-elements ('before', and 'after') and give them dimensions **/
 content:"";
 position:absolute;
 z-index:-1;
 top:20px;
 left:0;
 width:40%;
 height:1em;
 max-width:150px;
 -webkit-box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
 -moz-box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
 box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
 -webkit-transform:rotate(70deg);
 -moz-transform:rotate(70deg);
 -o-transform:rotate(70deg);
 transform:rotate(70deg);
}

.top:after{
  /**One of the pseudo-elements then needs to be positioned on the other side of the element and rotated in the opposite direction. This is easily done by overriding only the properties that need to differ **/
 right:0;
 left:auto;
 -webkit-transform:rotate(-70deg);
 -moz-transform:rotate(-70deg);
 -o-transform:rotate(-70deg);
 transform:rotate(-70deg);
}

.bottom:before,
.bottom:after {
  /** Generate pseudo-elements ('before' and 'after') and push them behind the container box. Position pseudo-elements ('before', and 'after') and give them dimensions **/
 content:"";
 position:absolute;
 z-index:-2;
 top:90px;
 left:0;
 width:10%;
 max-width:150px;
 -webkit-box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
 -moz-box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
 box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
 -webkit-transform:rotate(99deg);
 -moz-transform:rotate(99deg);
 -o-transform:rotate(99deg);
 transform:rotate(99deg);
}

.bottom:after{
  /**One of the pseudo-elements then needs to be positioned on the other side of the element and rotated in the opposite direction. This is easily done by overriding only the properties that need to differ **/
 right:0;
 left:auto;
 -webkit-transform:rotate(-99deg);
 -moz-transform:rotate(-99deg);
 -o-transform:rotate(-99deg);
 transform:rotate(-99deg);
}
share|improve this question
4  
Take a look at this link It adds a bottom curl look, but it might help you figure out how to get it working on the left and right. –  John Koerner Jan 14 '13 at 19:14
    
Thanks, I updated the question with a jsfiddle and css that I have so far. I think it's close but still having some issues. –  Mdd Jan 15 '13 at 3:30
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use before and after CSS properties to achieve that. check this out: http://nicolasgallagher.com/css-drop-shadows-without-images/demo/

Another way:

HTML:

<div id="box">
<h1>css-3-box-shadow</h1>
<p>some text</p>
</div>

CSS:

#box:after {
    left: auto;
    right: 10px;
    transform: rotate(3deg);
}
#box:before, #box:after {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
    bottom: 15px;
    box-shadow: 0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
    content: "";
    left: 10px;
    max-width: 300px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 80%;
    transform: rotate(-3deg);
    width: 50%;
    z-index: -1;
}
#box:before, #box:after {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
    bottom: 15px;
    box-shadow: 0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
    content: "";
    left: 10px;
    max-width: 300px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 80%;
    transform: rotate(-3deg);
    width: 50%;
    z-index: -1;
}
#box {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 #DDDDDD;
    border-radius: 4px 4px 4px 4px;
    color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8);
    line-height: 1.5;
    margin: 60px auto;
    padding: 2em 1.5em;
    position: relative;
    text-shadow: 0 1px 0 #FFFFFF;
    width: 60%;
}

Ref: http://www.red-team-design.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/css3-box-shadow.html

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tips! I have updated the question with a jsfiddle and the CSS that I have so far. Here's the fiddle again: jsfiddle.net/kXuQY The CSS for my "top" class seems to be overridden or something is causing it not to get applied. –  Mdd Jan 15 '13 at 3:31
1  
@Mdd - What you can do is, create 3 separate DIVs and then apply shadows (using the above code) to top and bottom div (top shadow on the 1st div and bottom shadow on the 3rd div). Leave the middle one as it is for the content. And finally, position all the DIVs to make the whole thing look like a unified box. –  Learner Jan 15 '13 at 15:34
    
Thanks! I updated the fiddle and I know what to do now. Thanks again! jsfiddle.net/kLhP8 –  Mdd Jan 15 '13 at 17:36
1  
Good to hear that. One thing though, I would suggest to change "bottom" transform to around 107deg instead of 99deg as the shadow looks a bit cut off at the bottom with 99deg. –  Learner Jan 15 '13 at 18:16
    
Thanks Mihir! :) –  Mdd Jan 15 '13 at 18:27
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