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How can I create a hard link to a directory in OSX?

This feature has been added to their file system in 10.5 (for time machine), but I could not find any information on actually using it from the command line.

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marked as duplicate by inspectorG4dget, Frank van Puffelen, greatwolf, dpassage, Sajeetharan Dec 27 '14 at 5:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
This should be on SuperUser if you're interested in how to access this feature as a user from the commandline. If you'd want to do it programmatically that'd be a different story :-) –  Joey Sep 16 '09 at 12:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Unfortunately Apple has crippled the ln command. You can use the following program to create a hard link to a directory:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
 if (argc != 3) {
  fprintf(stderr,"Use: hlink <src_dir> <target_dir>\n");
  return 1;
 }
 int ret = link(argv[1],argv[2]);
 if (ret != 0)
  perror("link");
 return ret;
}

Take into account that the hard linked directories may not be in the same parent directory, so you can do this:

$ gcc hlink.c -o hlink
$ mkdir child1
$ mkdir parent
$ ./hlink child1 parent/clone2
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1  
Hey, I've been using this for a while now - thanks a ton. However, I noticed that if I delete a hard linked directory (rm -rf) it will also wipe the contents of the original source dir. Makes sense since rm -rf goes through the dir and removes file by file. However, I'd like to have the ability to remove the hardlink directly. Is that possible? –  felixge Oct 20 '09 at 12:28
2  
Have you tried the unlink command and system call? –  Freeman Oct 22 '09 at 18:50
1  
+1 (would give more if I could) This has totally saved my bacon! –  Dave DeLong Feb 3 '10 at 20:53
7  
Looks like they patched this up... tried this in Snow Leopard and I get "link: Operation not permitted" –  taber May 19 '10 at 20:42
4  
@taber: be sure to create the hard link in a directory different from the source directory's parent (e.g., in parent/ in Freeman's example). This is one of the restrictions outlined in osxbook.com/blog/2008/11/09/hfsdebug-40-and-new-hfs-features –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Dec 6 '10 at 14:59

I have bundled up the suggested answer in a git rep if anybody is interested: https://github.com/selkhateeb/hardlink

Once installed, create a hard link with:

hardlink source destination

I also noticed that unlink command does not work on snow leopard, so I added an option to unlink:

hardlink -u destination

To install Hardlink, use homebrew and run:

brew install hardlink-osx
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1  
Thanks. Worked for me. But you should add Jean-Philippe Pellet comment do README. –  Maciek Sawicki Feb 23 '12 at 16:20
    
@Sam : I'm on 10.6.8. Linking is working, but unlinking isn't. :( Any suggestions? –  Jerry B May 1 '14 at 2:35
1  
It's worth noting that this is now up on Homebrew. brew install hardlink-osx –  Amir Abiri Mar 31 at 8:06
    
Thanks @AmirAbiri, added –  bfred.it Apr 14 at 0:47

In answer to the question by the_undefined about how to remove a hardlink to a directory without removing the contents of other directories to which it is linked: As far as I can tell, it can't be done from the command line using builtin commands. However, this little program (inspired by Freeman's post) will do it:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
 if (argc != 2) {
  fprintf(stderr,"Use: hunlink <dir>\n");
  return 1;
 }
 int ret = unlink(argv[1]);
 if (ret != 0)
  perror("unlink");
 return ret;
}

To follow on with Freeman's example,

$ gcc hunlink.c -o hunlink
$ echo "foo bar" > child1/baz.txt
$ ./hunlink parent/clone2

Will remove the hardlink at parent/clone2, but leave the directory child1 and the file child1/baz.txt alone.

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Another solution is to use bindfs https://code.google.com/p/bindfs/ which is installable via port:

sudo port install bindfs
sudo bindfs ~/source_dir ~/target_dir
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protected by Community Jul 26 '11 at 18:26

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