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I've got a strange behavior when using Match.Create with Moq.

The following code snippet doesn't pass, when I extract Match.Create as a variable:

      var mock = new Mock<IA>();
      mock.Object.Method ("muh");
      mock.Verify (m => m.Method (Match.Create<string> (s => s.Length == 3)));

      public interface IA
      {
        void Method (string arg);
      }

What is the reason?

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3 Answers 3

EDIT: Got your question wrong, again:

The problem is that Match.Create<string> (s => s.Length == 3); returns a string. It can only be used inside the .Verify() call. The same happens with It.Is<string>(Expr), if you extract a variable it will be passed as a simple System.String, and verify will check against that as a value (and fail because that value will be just String.Empty)

var mock = new Mock<IA>();

//this will be a string, and contain just ""
var yourMatcher = Match.Create<string> (s => s.Length == 3);

mock.Object.Method ("muh");

//this will fail because "muh" != ""
mock.Verify (m => m.Method (yourMatcher));

public interface IA
{
  void Method (string arg);
}
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Any way around this? –  Matthias Jan 14 '13 at 21:17

You're extracting too much. Predicate is enough:

var mock = new Mock<IA>();
Predicate<string> isThreeCharsLong = s => s.Length == 3;
mock.Object.Method("muh");
mock.Verify(m => m.Method(Match.Create<string>(isThreeCharsLong)));

Alternatively, for the same effect but slightly shorter syntax you can use It.Is matcher with expression parameter:

var mock = new Mock<IA>();
Expression<Func<string, bool>> isThreeCharsLong = s => s.Length == 3;
mock.Object.Method("muh");
mock.Verify(m => m.Method(It.Is<string>(isThreeCharsLong)));
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Thanks both of you. But I found another good solution for this. As in the quick start described, you can also use a method. First I thought it would make no difference, whether I use a variable or method. But obviously Moq is clever enough. So the expression and predicate stuff can be converted into:

public string StringThreeCharsLong ()
{
  return Match.Create<string> (s => s.Length == 3);
}

I think this is great, because it reduces the noise in unit tests.

MyMock.Verify (m => m.Method (StringThreeCharsLong());
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+1: This is indeed the cleanest way to refactor such case - you should mark your answer as accepted. –  jimmy_keen Jan 15 '13 at 21:40

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