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I currently have a compilation issue with Gradle using target 1.7 and source 1.7 vs Eclipse Juno using the built-in 1.7 jdk.

I have 5 classes :

Info.java --> Interface that has no methods (for example)

public interface Info { //... }

RealInfo.java --> Interface that extends the Info interface

public interface RealInfo extends Info { //... }

AbstractManager.java --> Abstract class that has the method "getInfo()"

public abstract class AbstractManager<I extends Info>
{
    public I info;
    public I getInfo()
    {
        return this.info;
    }
}

Manager.java --> Interface that has the method "getInfo()"

public interface Manager
{
    public <I extends Info> I getInfo();
}

DefaultManager.java --> Extends AbstractManager

public class DefaultManager extends AbstractManager<RealInfo> implements Manager
{
    //...
}

If you copy/paste this code into eclipse, everything works fine. There's no compilation error. However, if I build it with Gradle, using target jdk 1.7, the compiler will not like it :

DefaultManager.java:16: error: DefaultManager is not abstract and does not override abstract method <I>getInfo() in Manager
public class DefaultManager extends AbstractManager<RealInfo> implements Manager
                                                       ^
  where I is a type-variable:
    I extends Info declared in method <I>getInfo()

Do you have any idea on what could happen there?

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I don't believe this is a Gradle problem. I suspect if you try this using javac from the command line, you'll get the same problem. If so, I suggest: 1) remove the Gradle tag from this question; 2) report the bug to the Eclipse guys. There's often differences between the Eclipse compiler and the Oracle compiler, and it often turns out that Eclipse is right and Oracle is wrong! But the Eclipse guys are great at figuring out what's what and raising it with Oracle, which is why I always suggest reporting it to them! ;-) –  dty Jan 14 '13 at 21:18
    
Removed the gradle tag as this has nothing to do with Gradle. This is a difference between javac and the Eclipse compiler. –  Hiery Nomus Jan 14 '13 at 22:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've found what Javac doesn't seem to like.

I modified my AbstractManager class to :

public abstract class AbstractManager<I extends Info>
{
    public I info;
    public <I extends Info> I getInfo()
    {
        return (I) this.info;
    }
}

Gradle now accepts this code while compiling with Javac. It's strange though that it cannot properly infer I to <I extends Info>. Eclipse's compiler can handle the two syntaxes.

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