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How to correctly forward declare classes ?. If I try this it won't compile:

#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>

class B ;

class A
{
    public:
    B returnB()
    {
        return B() ;
    }
} ;

class B
{
    public:
    A returnA()
    {
        return A() ;
    }
} ;

int main(void)
{

    getch() ;
    return 0 ;
}
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9  
The problem isn't the forward-declaration. The problem is using an incomplete type where a complete type is needed. –  chris Jan 14 '13 at 21:02
1  
Your forward declaration is fine, but this is not a scenario in which forward declaration is sufficient. Check your book again, then correct it yourself! :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '13 at 21:05
1  
@Component10: Nah, we don't need it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '13 at 21:07
2  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit, Shh, don't discourage the act of doing so. Even if it isn't necessary here, I'd rather have spurious ones than missing the ones that are necessary. –  chris Jan 14 '13 at 21:08
2  
@Component10: Oh, you haven't got those yet? Don't worry it'll come –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '13 at 21:11
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sometimes there are scenarios where you must define your functions outside of the class:

class B;

class A
{
public:
    B returnB();
};

class B
{
public:
    A returnA();
};

B A::returnB()
{
    return B();
}

A B::returnA()
{
    return A();
}

Usually the definition (implementation) goes inside a separate *.cpp file. If it is in a header, then it has to be inline.

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thanks for reply. Now I know how to do this things :) –  user1978386 Jan 14 '13 at 21:10
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