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I'm trying to stub the facebook graph api that is wrapped by Koala. My goal is to verify that the graph is initialized with the given access token, and the method "me" is called.

My rspec code looks like:

require 'spec_helper'

describe User do

  describe '.new_or_existing_facebook_user' do
    it 'should get the users info from facebook using the access token' do
      # SETUP
      access_token = '231231231321'
      # build stub of koala graph that expected get_object with 'me' to be called and return an object with an email
      stub_graph = stub(Koala::Facebook::API)
      stub_graph.stub(:get_object). with('me'). and_return({
        :email => 'jame1231231tl@yahoo.com'
      })
      # setup initializer to return that stub
      Koala::Facebook::API.stub(:new) .with(access_token). and_return(stub_graph)

      # TEST
      user = User.new_or_existing_facebook_user(access_token)

      # SHOULD
      stub_graph.should_receive(:get_object).with('me') 
    end
  end
end

Model code looks like:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  # attributes left out for demo
  class << self
    def new_or_existing_facebook_user(access_token)
      @graph = Koala::Facebook::API.new(access_token)
      @me = @graph.get_object('me')

      # rest of method left out for demo
    end
  end
end

When running the test, I get the error:

  1) User.new_or_existing_facebook_user should get the users info from facebook using the access token
     Failure/Error: stub_graph.should_receive(:get_object).with('me')
       (Stub Koala::Facebook::API).get_object("me")
           expected: 1 time
           received: 0 times
     # ./spec/models/user_spec.rb:21:in `block (3 levels) in <top (required)>'

How am I stubbing that method wrong?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The should_receive needs to go before the method is called. Rspec message expectations work by taking over the method and listening to it, very similarly to stub. In fact, you can put it in place of your stub.

The expectation will then decide whether it succeeds or not after the rest of the spec is finished.

Try this instead:

describe User do

  describe '.new_or_existing_facebook_user' do
    it 'should get the users info from facebook using the access token' do
      # SETUP
      access_token = '231231231321'
      # build stub of koala graph that expected get_object with 'me' to be called and return an object with an email
      stub_graph = stub(Koala::Facebook::API)

      # SHOULD
      stub_graph.should_receive(:get_object).with('me').and_return({
        :email => 'jamesmyrtl@yahoo.com'
      })

      # setup initializer to return that stub
      Koala::Facebook::API.stub(:new).with(access_token).and_return(stub_graph)     

      # TEST
      user = User.new_or_existing_facebook_user(access_token)
    end
  end
end
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First off, I would not use stub since stub indicates you are most likely not concerned with the behavior of the object. You should use mock instead even though they instantiate the same thing. This more clearly shows you would like to test its behavior.

Your problem comes from that you are setting the expectation after the test. You need to set the expectation before the test in order to have it register.

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What are the exact differences between mock and stub? Is there any documentation out there that clearly explains this? –  Oved D Jan 14 '13 at 21:28
2  
There are no differences in what it invokes. They both make a Rspec mock object. stub in testing indicates that you are not concerned with the behavior of the object, you just want to achieve its functionality. mock indicates that you are testing the behavior of something. It just makes it more readable. –  Michael Papile Jan 14 '13 at 21:31
    
see martinfowler.com/articles/mocksArentStubs.html basically stub has less of a Behavior driven testing meaning than mock when people read your tests, and it is clear you are testing behavior here. –  Michael Papile Jan 14 '13 at 21:36
    
A Short description can be found in the rspec rdoc page: rubydoc.info/gems/rspec-mocks/frames –  Daniel Evans Jan 14 '13 at 21:59
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