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So in my server code, variable invites is undefined outside of the success function.

function getInvites(id){
    var InvitesTable = tables.getTable("Invites").where({"PlanID": id}).select("UserID","Attending");
    var invites;
    InvitesTable.read({ success: function(resultss) { 
                           invites = resultss;
                           console.log(invites); //works here
                           }});
    console.log(invites); //undefined here
}

From similar questions, I realize its because of it being asynchronous. So the success function call is run after the console.log(invites); //undefined here call.

My question is how do I stop that in Windows Azure?

Added code

function read(query, user, request) {

        request.execute({
            success: function(results) {
                results.forEach(function(r) {

                    getInvites(r.id, function(invites) {
                        r.invites = invites;
                    });
                });
                request.respond();
            }
        });

}

function getInvites(id, cb){
    var InvitesTable = tables.getTable("Invites").where({"PlanID": id}).select("UserID","Attending");
    InvitesTable.read({ success: function(results) {
                           if (cb) cb(results);
                           }});
}
share|improve this question
    
In the code you've posted, you're repeatedly getting the invites for a single ID (query.id) for each result. Is this intentional, or did you mean to get the invites for an ID that's contained in each result? –  josh3736 Jan 15 '13 at 19:04
    
I meant to get invites for each result, I changed query.id to r.id –  user972616 Jan 15 '13 at 19:12
    
I thought so :) –  josh3736 Jan 15 '13 at 19:13
    
Thanks for pointing that out :) –  user972616 Jan 15 '13 at 19:15
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't "stop that," you design your application around the async nature of whatever environment you're using.

I assume you're trying to do something like this:

function getInvites(id){
    var InvitesTable = tables.getTable("Invites").where({"PlanID": id}).select("UserID","Attending");
    var invites;
    InvitesTable.read({ success: function(resultss) { 
                           invites = resultss;
                           }});
    return invites;
}

// later...

var invites = getInvites(someId);
//do something with `invites`

This obviously won't work, since you return the value of invites before the async call completes.

Instead, you write your app in async style:

function getInvites(id, cb){
    var InvitesTable = tables.getTable("Invites").where({"PlanID": id}).select("UserID","Attending");
    InvitesTable.read({ success: function(resultss) { 
                           if (cb) cb(resultss);
                           }});
}

// later...

getInvites(someId, function(invites) {
    //do something with `invites`
});

This leaves out error handling code for the sake of simplicity, so you'd have to add that as well.


After seeing your full code, it looks like you have a simple problem of managing many parallel asynchronous operations. Consider what happens: your loop runs, iterating over an array of n objects. For each, you call getInvites, which begins a database request and returns.

This means your loop runs very quickly, but now you have n outstanding database requests that you must wait on before you can call request.respond().

An extremely basic solution would be to do something like count the number of times your getInvites callback is called, and then finally complete the request when that number reaches n.

However, it is time-consuming and mistake-prone to manage this bookkeeping manually every time you make async requests. This is a situation where flow control libraries are extremely useful. I will use jQuery's Deferred in this example, since it may already be familiar to you (even if you don't know you've actually used it before — if you've ever used jQuery's XHR API, you've used Deferreds).

Given that you're in a server environment, you obviously don't have jQuery; however, there are people who have extracted only the code necessary for Deferred for you.

Once we have Deferreds for every pending request, we can use when to register a callback that gets called only after all pending Deferreds complete.

function read(query, user, request) {

        request.execute({
            success: function(results) {
                var dfds = [];
                for (var i = 0; i < results.length; i++) {
                    dfds.push(getInvites(results[i].id)); // Makes an array of Deferreds representing
                                                          // each of our pending requests.
                }


                Deferred.when.apply(Deferred, dfds) // see details below
                    .done(function() {
                        for (var i = 0; i < results.length; i++) {
                            results[i].invites = arguments[i]; // Copy each set of invites to each result
                        }
                        request.respond(); // We're done!
                    })
                    .fail(function() {
                        // Handle errors here
                    });
            }
        });

}

function getInvites(id){
    var dfd = new Deferred(); // Create a new Deferred, which automatically starts in the 'pending' state
    var InvitesTable = tables.getTable("Invites").where({"PlanID": id}).select("UserID","Attending");
    InvitesTable.read({ success: function(results) {
                           dfd.resolve(results); // When we get data back, we 'resolve' the Deferred --
                                                 // in other words, say its operation is done,
                                                 // and pass along the operation's results.
                           },
                        error: function(err) { // TODO: Not sure if this is how the API you're using handles errors
                            dfd.reject(err); // Marks the Deferred as failed.
                        }});

    return dfd.promise(); // We (synchronously) return the Promise.  The caller can attach event handlers
                          // to the Promise, which are invoked when we eventually resolve or reject the Deferred.
}

Notes:

  • jQuery.when (or in this server-side case, Deferred.when) normally expects you to pass a fixed number of Deferreds as arguments:

    $.when(dfd1, dfd2).done(function(result1, result2) { ... });
    

    However, we have a variable number of Deferreds, so we must apply an array of Deferreds to when and then in the done handler, access each result via the implicit arguments object.

  • Array.forEach(...) is slow. In most cases, it is better to use a regular for loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that helped, Do you know how I could access invites outside of the function(invites) scope? Because I am calling getInvites from a foreach loop and the variable that invites is assigned to is inside the foreach loop. So I am not able to use the variable inside the function(invites) scope due to the same problem –  user972616 Jan 15 '13 at 17:04
    
I'm not quite sure what you're trying to do. Could you edit your question with an example of your loop and how you're trying to use invites? –  josh3736 Jan 15 '13 at 17:09
    
I added the loop at the bottom –  user972616 Jan 15 '13 at 17:14
    
OK, see update. –  josh3736 Jan 15 '13 at 19:28
    
Great answer :) very detailed and informative. I cannot add libraries directly onto Azure as I can only work with scripts that correspond to CRUD functions of storage tables. So I installed jQuery-deferred-for-node from your link, extracted the code for deferred and minimal jQuery and tried adding it directly on read script. But sadly copy paste did not work and I am getting an error "ReferenceError: module is not defined" on the 9th line of minimum jQuery –  user972616 Jan 15 '13 at 21:14
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I've stumbled on same need for synchronous DB access, so I wrote small module called query-synchronizer. Idea was to count how many times query was started and ended. If all started count was equal to ended count, other part of code would be executed. Your code would look like this:

var synchronizer = require('query-synchronizer');

function read(query, user, request) {
    request.execute({
        success: function(results) {
            results.forEach(function(r) {
                var InvitesTable = tables.getTable("Invites").where({"PlanID": r.id}).select("UserID","Attending");
                synchronizer.read(InvitesTable, function(results){
                    r.invites = invites;
                });

            });
            synchronizer.done(function(){
                request.respond();
            });
        }
    });

}
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