Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I made a program with visual studio and after publishing and then installing on another machine, whenever it needs to access the database, it looks in the original project folder, where the connection string was made. "C:\Users\Cody\Dropbox\Visual Studio 11\Projects\OverPower\OverPower\opdata.sqlite" This path of course does not exist on another computer, which is why I am getting the error when it tries to access the database, but I thought that after publishing/deploying it would redirect to the installation directory to find this file. I've also tried making the file a resource and changing the connection string and file location of the database to the one above but going through the resources folder.

share|improve this question
    
Please show us your code. –  SLaks Jan 14 '13 at 21:42
    
How do you build your connection string? Do you read it from a config file? If so, do you distribute this config file with your application? –  Steve Jan 14 '13 at 21:47

1 Answer 1

I eventually found a post that made some serious sense and it even had a sample program to run and see how it works. I changed a few things and copied the settings.vb and ConnectionStringBuilder.vb classes to my project.

This is what my ConnectionStringBuilder Class looks like...

Dim path = Application.StartupPath + "\op_card.sqlite"
' Let's build our connection string.
Dim sqlConnString As New System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnectionStringBuilder() With {
  .DataSource = path
}
Return sqlConnString.ConnectionString

and for the settings.vb class, I only changed the string found at the bottom, after the text, Me(, to the property name I found in the Settings.settings or My.Settings file. Here is the link to the article that helped me....

How to change default connection string setting during runtime

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.