Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I center a variable width table with css as:

#article {width=1000px}
table.center {margin: 0 auto}

<div id="article">
<table class="center">
.....
</table>
</div>

But in this case I like to off center this table a bit to the left.
Be aware that the width of this table is variable.
The center of the table must be on 40% off the div it's in.
Suppose in case below the table has a width 200px.
Normally while centering it has 400px space on the left and right side.
But now I like to have 300px at the left and 500px at the right of the table.

#article {width=1000px}
table.offcenter20left { ??? }

<div id="article">
<table class="offcenter20left">
....
</table>
</div>

what CSS code do I need to off-center this table?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

With the use of a wrapper, you could use a negative margin. This supports percent values and will allow it to be dynamic.

HTML

<div class="article">
  <div class="wrapper">
    <table class="offcenter20left">
      <tr>
        <td>.....</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </div>
</div>

CSS

table.offcenter20left {
  margin:0 auto;
}

.wrapper {
  margin-left:-20%; /* adjust as desired */
}

Source: http://jsfiddle.net/8Gas6/3
Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/8Gas6/3/show

share|improve this answer
1  
In this case the negative margin would be 2 times the amount you wanted to offset from 50% right? So in the example margin-left should be -20%? –  James Montagne Jan 14 '13 at 22:16
    
@JamesMontagne Thanks for pointing that out. For me it's just laziness at the moment. :P I had to code an HTML email that looks decent in Outlook 2007 today, so I feel entitled to be a little lazy at the moment. –  Joseph Marikle Jan 14 '13 at 22:20
    
Thanks!You are right it must be offcenter10left indeed! As James stated It will come in trouble if the width of the table is too big. I didn't thougt of that. Have to think about that... So far thanks guys –  luvTweb Jan 14 '13 at 22:21
    
@user1792635 You're welcome. Glad to help. :) –  Joseph Marikle Jan 14 '13 at 22:23

Wrap the table with a div and use relative positioning:

<div class="center-outer">
  <table class="center-inner">
    <!-- ... -->
  </table>
</div>

The accompanying CSS:

.center-outer {
  position: relative;
  float: left;
  left: 40%;
}

.center-inner {
  position: relative;
  float: left;
  left: -50%;
}

.center-inner shifts the table to the left by 50% of its own width, centering it along where its left edge would normally be. .center-outer then pushes both the div and the table to the right by 40% of the div's parent's width, effectively centering the table at 40%.

If you intend to center more than just the table within the same parent, it would be simpler to use 2 wrappers; then it's not necessary to attach .center-inner to each child:

<div class="center-outer">
  <div class="center-inner">
    <table>
      <!-- ... -->
    </table>
    <p>
      <!-- ... -->
    </p>
  </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
1  
only minor issue I see is if the content of the table stretches to >60% of the containing div, your wrapper will stretch beyond the bounds of the containing div. –  James Montagne Jan 14 '13 at 22:11
    
Thanks Nikita for your input and James for making me aware of possible trouble... –  luvTweb Jan 14 '13 at 22:24
    
Good point, @JamesMontagne. Are there any possible consequences of that? Unless you have CSS rules that unintentionally affect the wrappers, I don't believe any problems could arise, but please correct me if I'm wrong. –  Nikita Kouevda Jan 14 '13 at 22:38
    
Only thing I can think of is causing a horizontal scrollbar where it doesn't seem to be needed. –  James Montagne Jan 15 '13 at 0:55

With CSS3 Calc you can perform the math dynamically:

margin-left: calc(40% - 50px);

(Assuming the half of the pixels in your example, to make it works on jsFiddle with smaller screens too: 500 total pixels, a table of 100px width)

(50px in the calc() is the half of your table size)

http://jsfiddle.net/u4Haa/

share|improve this answer
    
intresting, but the 50px I assume is half of the table size? Point is: it must work with every table size (normally I ommit the size). So the 50px is not known... Can be anything. And to make things more worse (and I didn't realize this till a few minutes ago): if the table grows in width it may not overflow at the left side... –  luvTweb Jan 14 '13 at 22:35
    
Absolutely, you should use calc() when you know the dimensions... (I've been fooled by the pixels specified in your question, while the title clearly says dynamic width, my fault :) –  Andrea Ligios Jan 15 '13 at 13:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.