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I am developing a client&server application. Both application will be compiled in exe files. Server executables will be running only on server but client files will be redistributed commercially.

I am planning to use TAO(The ACE ORB) network library which has "open source software model". But its website http://www.theaceorb.com/product/license.html says it also includes GPERF library which has GNU license. I am very confused.

Am I allowed to use TAO in server and client both and make my source code private for both application ?

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closed as off topic by Bo Persson, martin clayton, Ram kiran, Ben Trengrove, iDev Feb 28 '13 at 4:13

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not if you plan to sell your program and someone requests for the code. your application is considered derivative work. caveat: i am not a lawyer. –  thang Jan 14 '13 at 21:48
    
I have sent a mail to developer company and they told me that it is not required to distribute source code for any project uses TAO. –  Burak Dermanlı Jan 14 '13 at 22:16
    
i think the way GNU GPL is worded, you don't have to distribute source code. however, when someone requests for the source code, you can't refuse, and you can't charge excessively for it. again, still not a lawyer. –  thang Jan 14 '13 at 23:21

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I am planning to use TAO(The ACE ORB) network library which has "open source software model". But its website http://www.theaceorb.com/product/license.html says it also includes GPERF library which has GNU license. I am very confused.

It is common with free software and open source software that it can contain other software programs with their own licenses. Like in this case the GPERF generator utility which is available under GNU license.

In such cases, if you make use of the "whole package" you need to reflect all licensing terms there-in.

In this particular case, more information about that kind of usage is provided:

TAO under certain circumstances also uses a software program called GPERF. This software was also written by Dr. Schmidt and is licensed under the terms of the Free Software Foundation's GNU Public License (GPL). Details on this licensing may also be found below.

And further on:

GPERF is a standalone software program. GPERF generates perfect hash functions for lookups based on a set of key words when the key words are known in advance. They are called perfect hash functions because only a single access into the data structure is needed in order to perform a lookup. When the set of IDL operations is known in advanced TAO uses the perfect hash functions generated by GPERF in order to perform the operation lookup in constant time. Similarly servant lookups can be done, if the set of servants is known in advanced.

I don't know GPERF specifically, however if it is used to generate code, the generated code does not automatically is GPL licensed only because the software used to create it is licensed under GPL (See GPL-FAQ: Is there some way that I can GPL the output people get from use of my program? For example, if my program is used to develop hardware designs, can I require that these designs must be free?).

So you need to check here if and how the GPL would apply to the work you want to distribute, e.g. probably the GPL'ed software is not even part of it?

For the general licensing of the package, it seems that there is "different" information available, e.g. here: http://www.cs.wustl.edu/~schmidt/ACE-copying.html

I'd say it is some kind of weakness, that there is not specific and commonly known FLOSS license for the code named, so the situation could be improved by contacting the original copyright owners and ask for such a common license and/or why it is not possible to provide one of these. That should give enough information how open that source-code actually is.

The part under GPL at least seems clear. The other code (if not covered by the named licensed of the sub-components) looks like a permissive license with an advertising clause, trademark information and information about liabilities for patent and copyright infringement.

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