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Consider the following hierarchy, where entities WidgetA and WidgetB extend an abstract Widget superclass:

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.JOINED)
public abstract class Widget implements Serializable  {

    @Column(name="serialNumber", length=64, nullable=false, unique=true)
    private String serialNumber;
    ...

and

@Entity
public class WidgetA extends Widget implements Serializable  {
...

and

@Entity
public class WidgetB extends Widget implements Serializable  {
...

I need to search for Widgets by serialNumber, but I don't know the concrete type of the Widget I'm searching for at runtime. What is the correct way to search for widgets by serialNumber such that if the serialNumber is that of a WidgetA, then an instance of WidgetA gets returned, and so on?

I am trying to use a findyBySerialNumber() in the Widget DAO, and I'm getting an error telling me I can't instantiate an abstract class, which makes sense, but I thought the persistence provider would know how to look in the concrete child entity tables and return the correct instance. Can I make it do this?

I am using "Spring Data JPA", so the Widget DAO is really simple:

public interface WidgetDAO extends JpaRepository<Widget, Long> {
    public Widget findBySerialNumber(String serialNumber);
}
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1  
seeing the implementation of findBySerialNumber() would help spot the error –  Affe Jan 14 '13 at 22:28
    
Yes, please post findBySerialNumber(). Is there any data that is not of type WidgetA or WidgetB? –  Mark Robinson Jan 15 '13 at 1:29
    
@Affe I added the implementation of findBySerialNumber() –  CFL_Jeff Jan 15 '13 at 18:18
    
@MarkRobinson I added the implementation of findBySerialNumber(). And all data is of type WidgetA or WidgetB. –  CFL_Jeff Jan 15 '13 at 18:18
    
Since it's spring-data-jpa he won't have an implementation of findBySerialNumber, it is automatically generated by spring-data-jpa using the name of the method and the parameters to generate an "appropriate" jpa query. –  digitaljoel Jan 15 '13 at 18:30
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+100

It seems you didn't specify a discriminator explicitly for your widget hierarchy. I think you can try to define it explicitly because Spring Data will manipulate bytecode to generate the queries, and so I suspect SpringData need to have those values explicitely defined.

Additionally in subclasses you need to indicate the discriminator value for each subclass.

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.JOINED)
@DiscriminatorColumn(name="WIDGET_TYPE")
public abstract class Widget implements Serializable  {

    @Column(name="serialNumber", length=64, nullable=false, unique=true)
    private String serialNumber;
    ...

-

@Entity
@DiscriminatorValue("A")
public class WidgetA extends Widget implements Serializable  {
...

-

@Entity
@DiscriminatorValue("B")
public class WidgetB extends Widget implements Serializable  {
...
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I was under the impression that if you don't specify @Discriminator, the JPA provider would assign one (eg I think Hibernate does it based on class name) –  sharakan Feb 5 '13 at 20:55
    
@sharakan you are right. The JPA provider is supposed to generate it automatically. But I don't recommend this because it will cause trouble if you refactor the code (changing package and/or classname since this is the default discriminator value used by hibernate). Additionnaly (and that's why I suggest this), I suspect that Spring Data need this explicit definition due to the way it manipulate bytecode to produce queries. –  ben75 Feb 6 '13 at 9:30
    
Interesting, hadn't thought of Spring perhaps causing a problem that way. I totally agree with the general reasons to specify discriminators by the way, +1 for that. –  sharakan Feb 6 '13 at 14:35
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Your objects and annotations look fine to me. I was able to take them, save a widget to a database, and fetch it out without a problem.

I think the the problem is in your data. Hibernate is probably finding a row in the Widget table that does not have a corresponding row in any of the sub class tables, and is therefore trying to create an instance of the superclass, and failing.

With InheritanceType.JOINED, you can either specify a discriminator, or let it do it for you (I believe by checking whether a row with that ID exists in the subclass table). But either way, you have to check your data to make sure there's not an entry in the super class table without a matching subclass row.

As a rule, I support @ben75's recommendation that you do explicitly specify @Discriminator for class hierarchies. It's better to have control over your discriminator values, so that later code changes don't alter the values in unexpected ways.

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Hibernate supports that query just fine, and will happily return an instance of the correct subclass. Without knowing what it is in the Spring Data implementation that is trying to make an instance of Widget, you should be able to just declare the query and have it run it directly, rather than using the parser.

public interface WidgetDAO extends JpaRepository<Widget, Long> {

    @Query("select w from Widget w where w.serialNumer = ?1")
    public Widget findBySerialNumber(String serialNumber);
}
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I tried putting the @Query annotation on the repository method as you suggested, and it made no difference. Any other suggestions? –  CFL_Jeff Jan 31 '13 at 20:59
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