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I wrote this small code to ascertain read behavior. 

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <errno.h>

int main ()
{
  ssize_t ret;
  int fd;
  char str[30] = {0};
  off_t lret

  fd = open("./sample", O_RDWR);
  printf("File descriptor = %d\n",fd);

  lret = lseek(fd,LONG_MAX,SEEK_SET);
  printf("%ld\n",lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_CUR));

  ret = read(fd, str, 20);
  if (ret == -1) {
     perror("read error");
  }
  else {
     printf("%ld\n",ret);
     printf("%s\n",str);
  }

  ret = write(fd, "bye", 3);
  if (ret == -1) {
     perror("write error");
  }
  else
     printf("%ld\n",ret);

  printf("%ld\n",lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_CUR));
  close (fd);

  return 0;
}

Here is the output:

$ cat sample
HELLO$ ./a.out
File descriptor = 3
4294967295
read error: Invalid argument
write error: Invalid argument
4294967295
$ ll sample
-rw-r--r--. 1 bruce stud 5 Jan 14 17:25 sample

But if I change lseek statement to

ret = lseek(fd,5,SEEK_SET);

read returns 0

$ ./a.out
File descriptor = 3
5
0

3
8
$ cat sample
HELLObye$ ll sample
-rw-r--r--. 1 bruce stud 8 Jan 14 17:26 sample

Why does read behave like this?

share|improve this question
1  
You need 64 bit read/write I/O –  wildplasser Jan 14 '13 at 22:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Note that the value returned by lseek is a off_t, not a size_t. The difference is that off_t is signed. When you take a signed value and make it unsigned, it appears like a large positive number.

I would expect that "LONG_MAX" is not actually 4294967295, but either 2147483647 (2^31-1) or a much larger number. So the 4294967295 comes from a -1 [it is 2^32-1, which is indeed the same as -1 in 32-bit math].

In other words, you are getting an error from lseek.

share|improve this answer
    
ssize_t is also signed, like off_t. It might not be the same size as off_t, however, and both might be different from long. –  Chris Dodd Jan 14 '13 at 23:32
    
On my system both ssize_t and off_t are 8 bytes long. # define LONG_MAX 9223372036854775807L –  Bruce Jan 14 '13 at 23:48
1  
The key point here is not the size of off_t, but the fact that off_t is signed and size_t is not. –  Mats Petersson Jan 14 '13 at 23:50
    
Ok. Here is what I did: off_t lret; lret = lseek(fd,LONG_MAX,SEEK_SET); if (lret == -1) perror("seek error"); and I got "seek error: Success" –  Bruce Jan 14 '13 at 23:59
    
and how do you explain the value of printf("%ld\n",lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_CUR)); being 4294967295. If there was an error in seek the value of file pointer should be 0, right? –  Bruce Jan 15 '13 at 0:01

Odd error results. What actual OS are you using? I added a check if (ret == -1) perror("lseek error"); just after the first lseek for better error checking.

On linux I see:

File descriptor = 3
lseek error: Invalid argument
0
5
HELLO
3
8

On OpenBSD I see:

File descriptor = 3
9223372036854775807
read error: File too large
write error: File too large
9223372036854775807

...both of which seem like reasonable responses

share|improve this answer
    
lseek has return type of off_t which is 8 bytes on my system. ret is of int type. That is what it prints an error on lseek. There is actually no error on lseek. –  Bruce Jan 14 '13 at 23:42
    
I think write succeeds in the first case when you run on Linux. I want to see if I seek past the maximum file size what happens on read and write. If I seek past the file size (not maximum file size), read returns 0. I think it should return -1 here also. –  Bruce Jan 14 '13 at 23:44

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