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I have some doubts on dereferencing of C pointers. Given the following code:

void *vptr; // declare as a void pointer type
int val = 1;
int *iptr;

// void type can hold any pointer type or reference
iptr = &val;
vptr = iptr;
printf("iptr=%p, vptr=%p\n", (void *)iptr, (void *)vptr);

When we do (void *)iptr, what are we actually printing? I thought that when dereferencing, it should print the number 1, but it actually prints an address. Why is that? And why is it necessary to add (void *) in front in order to print the address? Wouldn't iptr be enough?

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When we do (void *)iptr, what are we actually printing?

You are printing the value of iptr pointer in an implementation-defined way.

I thought that when dereferencing, it should print the number 1, but it actually prints an address

You are not dereferencing anything with the (void *) operation, you are casting to void *. To print the value of the object pointed by iptr you need to use the d conversion specifier with the argument *iptr (here you are dereferencing iptr pointer).

And why is it necessary to add (void *) in front in order to print the address?

Because p conversion specifier requires an argument of type void *.

Wouldn't iptr be enough?

iptr is a int * but p conversion specifier requires a void *, so without the cast it would invoke undefined behavior.

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Thanks for the answer. I still have the doubt of when we cast with (void *) which value are we getting? –  Hommer Smith Jan 15 '13 at 21:02
    
@HommerSmith I wrote it prints the value of the pointer in an implementation-defined way because the C Standard specified it this way for the pspecifier. This let for example the choice for a compiler to print a null pointer as (nil) or 0x0. Usually it prints a hexadecimal memory address. Note that the value of (void *) iptr is the same as the value of iptr except the type is different. –  ouah Jan 15 '13 at 21:54

When you write (void*)iptr, you cast the pointer to int to a pointer to void. Dereferencing a pointer is written as *iptr. This will take the value iptr points to.

When you print iptr with format %p, you print the address, where iptr points to. It is the same as &val. If you want to print the value iptr points to, use format %d

printf("*iptr=%d\n", *iptr);

This will show

*iptr=1

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To dereference a pointer in C/C++ use the * sign. What you're actually doing is casting iptr as a void pointer. Hence you see the address printed.

Try this instead: printf("iptr=%p, vptr=%p\n", *iptr, (void *)vptr); :)

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What does *vptr do? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 14 '13 at 22:59
    
I wrote that in haste. Dereferencing a void pointer in this way will result in a compile-time error. I edited my post to correct this. –  Spencer Cameron-Morin Jan 15 '13 at 7:32

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