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I want to center the content of the JTextField based on its content.

         for(int i=0; i<10; i++){                                   
               txtFields[i] = new JTextField(20); 

               txtFields[i].addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
                    @Override
                    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                        txtFields[i].setHorizontalAlignment(JTextField.CENTER);
                    }
                });
            }

I am getting error, local variable i cannot be accessed within innerclass. Any help will be helpful

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1  
Hopefully this thread might be of some help :-) –  nIcE cOw Jan 15 '13 at 3:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is because the variable i is not available in the scope that actionPerformed is called. A simple fix would be to declare a final variable in the for loop's scope:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {    
    final JTextField currentField = new JTextField(20);                               
    txtFields[i] = currentField;
    txtFields[i].addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
         @Override
         public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
             currentField.setHorizontalAlignment(JTextField.CENTER);
         }
    });
}

Or:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {                             
    txtFields[i] = new JTextField(20);
    txtFields[i].addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
         @Override
         public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
             ((JTextField) e.getSource()).setHorizontalAlignment(JTextField.CENTER);
         }
    });
}

Personally, I'd suggest you create an ActionListener subclass that accepts a JTextField in its constructor. It's a cleaner approach and helps reduce confusing defects like the one you encountered.

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What if he/she declare i outside the for loop. Will that work? –  Smit Jan 14 '13 at 23:32
1  
@smit No, it's still not in the right scope. It will also have the value of 9 after the loop is done anyway, which would mean that anytime actionPerformed is called on any of the ActionListener it would attempt to set the horizontal alignment on txtFields[9]. –  Marc Baumbach Jan 14 '13 at 23:38
    
I am still dubious. You could be right. Will have to try in free time. –  Smit Jan 14 '13 at 23:47
1  
The reason is because an anonymous inner class, the ActionListener, only has access to variables inside of itself as well as any final variables declared/available in the scope containing the anonymous inner class. More info here if you're interested: stackoverflow.com/questions/4732544/… –  Marc Baumbach Jan 14 '13 at 23:50
1  
@HovercraftFullOfEels and +1 mbaumbach. Thanks for updates and link. –  Smit Jan 14 '13 at 23:55

Just before the "addActionListener" statement write "final int j = i;", and then use "j" within the inner class.

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Why the ActionListener at all? Perhaps I'm misunderstanding your requirement, but won't this do what you're looking for:

for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
{                                   
  txtFields[i] = new JTextField(20);
  txtFields[i].setHorizontalAlignment(JTextField.CENTER);
}
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