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example = {};

example.Math = {
  sin: function() {console.log('sin');},
  cos: function() {console.log('cos');}
};

foo = function(){
   sin(); 
};
foo.prototype = window.example.Math;

console.log(foo.prototype)
console.log(foo.cos)
console.log(foo())

http://jsfiddle.net/Mubqy/9/

From what I thought I understood references are searched for through the scope chain. So theoretically if I assign an object with functions defined to a prototype I should get all of those functions and fields of the object or so I thought. Where is the error in my understanding? Neither of the above scenarios work. Additionally the internal proto variable is not being updated. Obviously that's why it is not working, but why doesn't my assignment to the prototype work?

share|improve this question
    
Where is 'sin' defined? –  Mooseman Jan 15 '13 at 0:02
1  
It would need to be this.sin(); –  Matt Greer Jan 15 '13 at 0:03
    
What are you trying to accomplish? See javascript.crockford.com/prototypal.html –  Aaron Kurtzhals Jan 15 '13 at 0:10
1  
Objects don't inherit from their own prototype property, but from their constructor's (also called their internal [[Prototype]] property). –  RobG Jan 15 '13 at 0:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you need to realize that the prototyped method needs to be run with the new keyword, and it needs to use this to access its variables and methods, like this:

example = {};

example.Math = {
  sin: function() {console.log('sin');},
  cos: function() {console.log('cos');}
};

foo = function(){
   this.sin(); 
};
foo.prototype = window.example.Math;

console.log(foo.prototype)
console.log(foo.cos)
console.log(new foo())
share|improve this answer

You missed two very crucial aspects of prototype.

  • A prototype acts as the parent of the object
  • You must initiate an instance of your object

First, use the keyword this to access object's methods and variables:

var foo = function(){
   this.sin(); 
};

Than initiate an instance of the object using the keyword new:

new foo();

Just like OOP, only not :)

http://jsfiddle.net/46fPe/

share|improve this answer
    
A prototype is in no way a "parent" of an object. It is simply a mechanism for inheritance. –  RobG Jan 15 '13 at 0:41
    
As far as my terminology goes, a parent (super) in OOP is the class you inherited from (extended). Correct me if my perspective is wrong. –  iMoses Jan 15 '13 at 7:54

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