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It works, but I would like to know if this markup is valid and would like an explanation of how links are parsed by the browser. I'm most interested in how HTML5 would interpret this.

<a href="http://site1.com/">
  <img src="/image.png" usemap="#map">
</a>

<map name="map">
  <area shape="rect" coords="0,0,50,100" href="http://site2.com">
  <area shape="rect" coords="50,0,100,100" href="http://site3.com">
  <area shape="rect" coords="100,0,150,100" href="http://site4.com">
</map>
share|improve this question
1  
The way I read w3.org/TR/2011/WD-html5-20110113/the-map-element.html it appears to me that since the map areas do not have coords or shape attributes specified, the map basically is just ignored. However since you have an image in the href anchor, if someone clicks on the image, they will go to site1.com since the image is a clickable link. However I am not an HTML guru. – Richard Chambers Jan 15 '13 at 0:23
    
Thank you for responding Richard. I should've been more explicit and not assumed that the coords and shapes were implied. I will update my question :) Thanks! – Tracy Fu Jan 15 '13 at 0:26
    
The way that I read section 4.8.14.2, Processing Model it appears that an click on the image is processed by the browser in two steps. The first step is to activate the link of the top most shape in the map (assuming that there is an over lap in the shapes and their coordinates) and the second is to send an event to the entire image itself. With these two steps, I would expect that with your HTML that if the click lands on one of the shapes, that link will fire and if there is not a shape where the click lands, then the link for the entire image will fire. – Richard Chambers Jan 15 '13 at 0:38
    
I suspect that markup will be ambiguous to screen reader users. At the very least make sure to add alt attributes to both the main image in the link and the map URLs. – steveax Jan 15 '13 at 0:43
    
@RichardChambers I'd like to give you credit for linking the spec. I didn't read all the way down to the bottom of that section initially, but I believe it satisfies my question. If you could drop it in an answer, I'll gladly accept it. – Tracy Fu Jan 15 '13 at 0:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I took a look at the w3 spec for maps in HTML 5 w3.org/TR/2011/WD-html5-20110113/the-map-element.html.

The way that I read section 4.8.14.2, Processing Model it appears that an click on the image is processed by the browser in two steps. The first step is to activate the link of the top most shape in the map (assuming that there is an over lap in the shapes and their coordinates) and the second is to send an event to the entire image itself. With these two steps, I would expect that with your HTML that if the click lands on one of the shapes, that link will fire and if there is not a shape where the click lands, then the link for the entire image will fire.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for finding this. All my "powers of Google" coupled with my inability to read through all the subsections of the W3 spec are to blame. Kinda like when I don't finish the last bites of my sandwiches. – Tracy Fu Jan 15 '13 at 0:58
1  
@TracyFu, the W3 spec is written in a way that does make your mind start to wander after the first couple of sentences. Yet it has the kinds of details that many other HTML sites skip over and this is the kind of detail in which you were interested. I am happy that I was able to help you. Enjoy the new year. – Richard Chambers Jan 15 '13 at 12:22

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