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I'm trying to use a set of IO modules from Lincoln Stein's Network Programming With Perl and am running into the following error:

Can't locate object method "blocking" via package "IO::LineBufferedSessionData" 
at /mxhome/charrison/private/perl/IO/SessionData.pm line 22.

The collection of modules, which I downloaded from the Addison/Wesley site for the book, does not contain a blocking() subroutine, and after some digging I found evidence that it expects to invoke a blocking() subroutine that's in IO::Socket or IO::File, or maybe IO::Handle.... and in fact there is a blocking() method in IO::Handle.

Here is the top portion of the IO::SessionData module, including the line it's barfing on:

package IO::SessionData;
# file: IO/SessionData.pm                                                                                                   
# Figure 13.5: The IO::SessionData Module Code                                                                              

use strict;
use Carp;
use IO::SessionSet;
use Errno 'EWOULDBLOCK';
use vars '$VERSION';
$VERSION = 1.00;

use constant BUFSIZE => 3000;

# Class method: new()                                                                                                       
# Create a new IO::SessionData object.  Intended to be called from within                                                   
# IO::SessionSet, not directly.                                                                                             
sub new {
  my $pack = shift;
  my ($sset,$handle,$writeonly) = @_;
  # make the handle nonblocking        
  #######################################################################                                                                                     
  $handle->blocking(0);       # <=== THIS IS THE CALL IT FAILS ON
  #######################################################################
  my $self = bless {
                outbuffer   => '',
                sset        => $sset,
                handle      => $handle,
                write_limit => BUFSIZE,
                writeonly   => $writeonly,
                choker      => undef,
                choked      => undef,
               },$pack;
  $self->readable(1) unless $writeonly;
  return $self;
}

I don't know if this is enough information to troubleshoot the problem. I understand very little of modules or object-oriented Perl. I am guessing that the author intends to invoke a blocking method within some superclass (e.g. IO::Handle?). The book was written in 2001 and perhaps some rules have changed. Or perhaps the text has a bug. Could anyone suggest a solution, or request further information?

UPDATE 1: Here is a stack trace generated by confess just before the offending blocking() call:

/Users/chap/private/wdi/server$ ./server_template -v
 at /Users/chap/private/wdi/lib/IO/SessionData.pm line 21.
    IO::SessionData::new('IO::LineBufferedSessionData', 'IO::LineBufferedSet=HASH(0x7fcbe19bd450)', 'IO::Socket::INET=GLOB(0x7fcbe18a8070)', undef) called at /Users/chap/private/wdi/lib/IO/LineBufferedSessionData.pm line 21
    IO::LineBufferedSessionData::new('IO::LineBufferedSessionData', 'IO::LineBufferedSet=HASH(0x7fcbe19bd450)', 'IO::Socket::INET=GLOB(0x7fcbe18a8070)', undef) called at /Users/chap/private/wdi/lib/IO/SessionSet.pm line 46
    IO::SessionSet::add('IO::LineBufferedSet=HASH(0x7fcbe19bd450)', 'IO::Socket::INET=GLOB(0x7fcbe18a8070)') called at /Users/chap/private/wdi/lib/IO/SessionSet.pm line 136
    IO::SessionSet::wait('IO::LineBufferedSet=HASH(0x7fcbe19bd450)') called at /Users/chap/private/wdi/lib/IO/LineBufferedSet.pm line 24
    IO::LineBufferedSet::wait('IO::LineBufferedSet=HASH(0x7fcbe19bd450)') called at ./server_template line 221

As you can see, new() is being called internally. (My application is at the bottom of the stack; everything else is from the book.)

share|improve this question
    
How is this function called? –  Karthik T Jan 15 '13 at 1:26
    
Where is the new method called? The documentation says that it shouldn't be called directly. You can get a call stack trace via confess (which will die) or via cluck (which you will have to import like use Carp qw(cluck)). –  amon Jan 15 '13 at 1:28
    
See update 1 to original question. –  Chap Jan 15 '13 at 3:13

1 Answer 1

What's happening is the class requires an argument (the second argument) that's passed to it that has the ->blocking() method. It should be invoked like this:

my $sset = ...;
my $handle = IO::Handle->new( ... ); #  build your IO handle
my $writeonly = ... ; 

my $session_data = IO::SessionData->new($sset, $handle, $writeonly);

the first line,

my $pack = shift;

Is the class name. The idiomatic name for this should be instead:

my $class = shift;

This extra variable is automatically added when new is called via the object invocation syntax (the Object::Name->method syntax.) By shifting, it removes that class name from @_, the parameter list. The remaining values are the arguments to the constructor. Since the second argument is called $handle and invokes that method, you need to pass it a variable that has that method. Anything that handles that method will do, but you probably want an IO::Handle of some kind. :)

Response to UPDATE 1:

If you look at the trace, you'll see:

IO::SessionData::new('IO::LineBufferedSessionData', 'IO::LineBufferedSet=HASH(0x7fcbe19bd450)', 'IO::Socket::INET=GLOB(0x7fcbe18a8070)', undef) 

as the thing that invokes the method. The IO::Socket::INET is an IO::Socket which is an IO::Handle, so it should be able to have the ->blocking() method available. What's line 21?

share|improve this answer
    
True - although, as noted in the comments, this is an internally-called method, not one I'm supposed to invoke directly. I assume that, somehow or other, through the magic of inheritance and what-not, $handle may be some sort of object derived from IO::Handle, whose blocking() method should have been invoked. Is there a way to rewrite the invocation to explicitly call IO::Handle->blocking(), or is that Not What One Does? –  Chap Jan 15 '13 at 3:23
    
Correct; you don't want to do that. In this case, that would be like calling a static method on the class itself, not what you want! :) That property is a per-instance property. –  Robert P Jan 15 '13 at 16:59
    
Well, it turns out to have been a user error on my part. I had not followed the example precisely and the result was this seemingly-unrelated error. If these had claimed to be production-ready, I might have a beef about their usage-checking, but they don't... :/ –  Chap Jan 15 '13 at 20:01

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