Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to convert a lat/long point into a 2d point so that I can display it on an image of the world-which is a mercator projection.

I've seen various ways of doing this and a few questions on stack overflow-I've tried out the different code snippets and although I get the correct longitude to pixel, the latitude is always off-seems to be getting more reasonable though.

I need the formula to take into account the image size, width etc.

I've tried this piece of code:

double minLat = -85.05112878;
double minLong = -180;
double maxLat = 85.05112878;
double maxLong = 180;

// Map image size (in points)
Double mapHeight = 768.0;
Double mapWidth = 991.0;

// Determine the map scale (points per degree)
double xScale = mapWidth/ (maxLong - minLong);
double yScale = mapHeight / (maxLat - minLat);



// position of map image for point
double x = (lon - minLong) * xScale;
double  y = - (lat + minLat) * yScale;

System.out.println("final coords: " + x + " " + y);

The latitude seems to be off by about 30px in the example I'm trying.Any help or advice?

update

Based on this question:Lat/lon to xy

I've tried to use the code provided but I'm still having some problems with latitude conversion, longitude is fine.

    int mapWidth = 991;
    int mapHeight = 768;

    double mapLonLeft = -180;
    double mapLonRight = 180;
    double mapLonDelta = mapLonRight - mapLonLeft;

    double mapLatBottom = -85.05112878;
    double mapLatBottomDegree = mapLatBottom * Math.PI / 180;
    double worldMapWidth = ((mapWidth / mapLonDelta) * 360) / (2 * Math.PI);
    double mapOffsetY = (worldMapWidth / 2 * Math.log((1 + Math.sin(mapLatBottomDegree)) / (1 - Math.sin(mapLatBottomDegree))));

    double x = (lon - mapLonLeft) * (mapWidth / mapLonDelta);
    double y = 0.1;
    if (lat < 0) {
        lat = lat * Math.PI / 180;
        y = mapHeight - ((worldMapWidth / 2 * Math.log((1 + Math.sin(lat)) / (1 - Math.sin(lat)))) - mapOffsetY);
    } else if (lat > 0) {
        lat = lat * Math.PI / 180;
        lat = lat * -1;
        y = mapHeight - ((worldMapWidth / 2 * Math.log((1 + Math.sin(lat)) / (1 - Math.sin(lat)))) - mapOffsetY);
        System.out.println("y before minus: " + y);
        y = mapHeight - y;
    } else {
        y = mapHeight / 2;
    }
    System.out.println(x);
    System.out.println(y);

When using the original code if the latitude value is positive it returned a negative point, so I modified it slightly and tested with the extreme latitudes-which should be point 0 and point 766, it works fine. However when I try a different latitude value ex: 58.07 (just north of the UK) it displays as north of spain.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Your formulas are just linear interpolation, which effectively implies you're doing an equirectangular projection rather than a Mercator. –  Drew Hall Jan 15 '13 at 1:27
    
I've updated the code, although still having problems with latitude –  drunkmonkey Jan 16 '13 at 16:02
    
As @Drew mentioned, if your map is a Marcator projection, you'll need to convert the lat/lng into x/y using a Mercator projection. Check if your map is Transverse Mercator or Spherical Mercator, then we'll get to the formulars... –  Michael Jan 17 '13 at 8:50
    
It's a spherical Mercator projection –  drunkmonkey Jan 17 '13 at 13:06
    
Although I strongly believe that you are approaching the problem totally wrong and you get confused with those code snippets, I would like to ask first before showing any code: variables minLat = -85.05112878 and maxLat = 85.05112878 are those arbitrary or you are sure that these are the limits of the map? Have you tried setting these to -90 and 90 respectively or to something very close to 90 (89.99 would suffice) to see if that solves your problem? That explains the UK-Spain thing you said. Anyway if you don't use the Mercator inverse formula, don't expect to get the correct results. –  Stelios Adamantidis Jan 17 '13 at 18:37

5 Answers 5

The Mercator map projection is a special limiting case of the Lambert Conic Conformal map projection with the equator as the single standard parallel. All other parallels of latitude are straight lines and the meridians are also straight lines at right angles to the equator, equally spaced. It is the basis for the transverse and oblique forms of the projection. It is little used for land mapping purposes but is in almost universal use for navigation charts. As well as being conformal, it has the particular property that straight lines drawn on it are lines of constant bearing. Thus navigators may derive their course from the angle the straight course line makes with the meridians. [1.]

Mercator projection

The formulas to derive projected Easting and Northing coordinates from spherical latitude φ and longitude λ are:

E = FE + R (λ – λₒ)
N = FN + R ln[tan(π/4 + φ/2)]   

where λO is the longitude of natural origin and FE and FN are false easting and false northing. In spherical Mercator those values are actually not used, so you can simplify the formula to

derivation of the mercator projection (wikipedia)

Pseudo code example, so this can be adapted to every programming language.

latitude    = 41.145556; // (φ)
longitude   = -73.995;   // (λ)

mapWidth    = 200;
mapHeight   = 100;

// get x value
x = (longitude+180)*(mapWidth/360)

// convert from degrees to radians
latRad = latitude*PI/180;

// get y value
mercN = log(tan((PI/4)+(latRad/2)));
y     = (mapHeight/2)-(mapWidth*mercN/(2*PI));

Sources:

  1. OGP Geomatics Committee, Guidance Note Number 7, part 2: Coordinate Conversions and Transformation
  2. Derivation of the Mercator projection
  3. National Atlas: Map Projections
  4. Mercator Map projection

EDIT Created a working example in PHP (because I suck at Java)

https://github.com/mfeldheim/mapStuff.git

share|improve this answer
1  
SWEET iv been looking for this equation put simply in pseudo code for aaaages ty –  AngryDuck Apr 18 '13 at 12:44
1  
If i want "zoom" in my coordinate points, Where i can multiplicate the zoom in this algorithm? –  matheusvmbruno Sep 13 '13 at 14:47
1  
It doesn't work. –  Phpdna Sep 16 '13 at 21:13
2  
Check out my example on github: github.com/mfeldheim/mapStuff.git –  Michel Feldheim Nov 5 '13 at 18:49
2  
Is it on purpose that y depends also on the mapWidth value - in your pseudo code it says: y = (mapHeight/2)-(mapWidthmercN/(2*PI)); - shouldn't that be: y = (mapHeight/2)-(mapHeightmercN/(2*PI)); ? –  Quasimondo Feb 8 at 16:38

You cannot merely transpose from longitude/latitude to x/y like that because the world isn't flat. Have you look at this post? Converting longitude/latitude to X/Y coordinate

UPDATE - 1/18/13

I decided to give this a stab, and here's how I do it:-

public class MapService {
    // CHANGE THIS: the output path of the image to be created
    private static final String IMAGE_FILE_PATH = "/some/user/path/map.png";

    // CHANGE THIS: image width in pixel
    private static final int IMAGE_WIDTH_IN_PX = 300;

    // CHANGE THIS: image height in pixel
    private static final int IMAGE_HEIGHT_IN_PX = 500;

    // CHANGE THIS: minimum padding in pixel
    private static final int MINIMUM_IMAGE_PADDING_IN_PX = 50;

    // formula for quarter PI
    private final static double QUARTERPI = Math.PI / 4.0;

    // some service that provides the county boundaries data in longitude and latitude
    private CountyService countyService;

    public void run() throws Exception {
        // configuring the buffered image and graphics to draw the map
        BufferedImage bufferedImage = new BufferedImage(IMAGE_WIDTH_IN_PX,
                                                        IMAGE_HEIGHT_IN_PX,
                                                        BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_RGB);

        Graphics2D g = bufferedImage.createGraphics();
        Map<RenderingHints.Key, Object> map = new HashMap<RenderingHints.Key, Object>();
        map.put(RenderingHints.KEY_INTERPOLATION, RenderingHints.VALUE_INTERPOLATION_BICUBIC);
        map.put(RenderingHints.KEY_RENDERING, RenderingHints.VALUE_RENDER_QUALITY);
        map.put(RenderingHints.KEY_ANTIALIASING, RenderingHints.VALUE_ANTIALIAS_ON);
        RenderingHints renderHints = new RenderingHints(map);
        g.setRenderingHints(renderHints);

        // min and max coordinates, used in the computation below
        Point2D.Double minXY = new Point2D.Double(-1, -1);
        Point2D.Double maxXY = new Point2D.Double(-1, -1);

        // a list of counties where each county contains a list of coordinates that form the county boundary
        Collection<Collection<Point2D.Double>> countyBoundaries = new ArrayList<Collection<Point2D.Double>>();

        // for every county, convert the longitude/latitude to X/Y using Mercator projection formula
        for (County county : countyService.getAllCounties()) {
            Collection<Point2D.Double> lonLat = new ArrayList<Point2D.Double>();

            for (CountyBoundary countyBoundary : county.getCountyBoundaries()) {
                // convert to radian
                double longitude = countyBoundary.getLongitude() * Math.PI / 180;
                double latitude = countyBoundary.getLatitude() * Math.PI / 180;

                Point2D.Double xy = new Point2D.Double();
                xy.x = longitude;
                xy.y = Math.log(Math.tan(QUARTERPI + 0.5 * latitude));

                // The reason we need to determine the min X and Y values is because in order to draw the map,
                // we need to offset the position so that there will be no negative X and Y values
                minXY.x = (minXY.x == -1) ? xy.x : Math.min(minXY.x, xy.x);
                minXY.y = (minXY.y == -1) ? xy.y : Math.min(minXY.y, xy.y);

                lonLat.add(xy);
            }

            countyBoundaries.add(lonLat);
        }

        // readjust coordinate to ensure there are no negative values
        for (Collection<Point2D.Double> points : countyBoundaries) {
            for (Point2D.Double point : points) {
                point.x = point.x - minXY.x;
                point.y = point.y - minXY.y;

                // now, we need to keep track the max X and Y values
                maxXY.x = (maxXY.x == -1) ? point.x : Math.max(maxXY.x, point.x);
                maxXY.y = (maxXY.y == -1) ? point.y : Math.max(maxXY.y, point.y);
            }
        }

        int paddingBothSides = MINIMUM_IMAGE_PADDING_IN_PX * 2;

        // the actual drawing space for the map on the image
        int mapWidth = IMAGE_WIDTH_IN_PX - paddingBothSides;
        int mapHeight = IMAGE_HEIGHT_IN_PX - paddingBothSides;

        // determine the width and height ratio because we need to magnify the map to fit into the given image dimension
        double mapWidthRatio = mapWidth / maxXY.x;
        double mapHeightRatio = mapHeight / maxXY.y;

        // using different ratios for width and height will cause the map to be stretched. So, we have to determine
        // the global ratio that will perfectly fit into the given image dimension
        double globalRatio = Math.min(mapWidthRatio, mapHeightRatio);

        // now we need to readjust the padding to ensure the map is always drawn on the center of the given image dimension
        double heightPadding = (IMAGE_HEIGHT_IN_PX - (globalRatio * maxXY.y)) / 2;
        double widthPadding = (IMAGE_WIDTH_IN_PX - (globalRatio * maxXY.x)) / 2;

        // for each country, draw the boundary using polygon
        for (Collection<Point2D.Double> points : countyBoundaries) {
            Polygon polygon = new Polygon();

            for (Point2D.Double point : points) {
                int adjustedX = (int) (widthPadding + (point.getX() * globalRatio));

                // need to invert the Y since 0,0 starts at top left
                int adjustedY = (int) (IMAGE_HEIGHT_IN_PX - heightPadding - (point.getY() * globalRatio));

                polygon.addPoint(adjustedX, adjustedY);
            }

            g.drawPolygon(polygon);
        }

        // create the image file
        ImageIO.write(bufferedImage, "PNG", new File(IMAGE_FILE_PATH));
    }
}

RESULT: Image width = 600px, Image height = 600px, Image padding = 50px

enter image description here

RESULT: Image width = 300px, Image height = 500px, Image padding = 50px

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
I've had a look, it doesn't seem like the author's code takes into consideration the size of the map image? I've updated my question with hopefully more accurate code-although still not right. –  drunkmonkey Jan 16 '13 at 15:54
    
I updated my post... this code takes account of the specified image width and height. –  limc Jan 18 '13 at 19:32

Java version of original Google Maps JavaScript API v3 java script code is as following, it works with no problem

public final class GoogleMapsProjection2 
{
    private final int TILE_SIZE = 256;
    private PointF _pixelOrigin;
    private double _pixelsPerLonDegree;
    private double _pixelsPerLonRadian;

    public GoogleMapsProjection2()
    {
        this._pixelOrigin = new PointF(TILE_SIZE / 2.0,TILE_SIZE / 2.0);
        this._pixelsPerLonDegree = TILE_SIZE / 360.0;
        this._pixelsPerLonRadian = TILE_SIZE / (2 * Math.PI);
    }

    double bound(double val, double valMin, double valMax)
    {
        double res;
        res = Math.max(val, valMin);
        res = Math.min(val, valMax);
        return res;
    }

    double degreesToRadians(double deg) 
    {
        return deg * (Math.PI / 180);
    }

    double radiansToDegrees(double rad) 
    {
        return rad / (Math.PI / 180);
    }

    PointF fromLatLngToPoint(double lat, double lng, int zoom)
    {
        PointF point = new PointF(0, 0);

        point.x = _pixelOrigin.x + lng * _pixelsPerLonDegree;       

        // Truncating to 0.9999 effectively limits latitude to 89.189. This is
        // about a third of a tile past the edge of the world tile.
        double siny = bound(Math.sin(degreesToRadians(lat)), -0.9999,0.9999);
        point.y = _pixelOrigin.y + 0.5 * Math.log((1 + siny) / (1 - siny)) *- _pixelsPerLonRadian;

        int numTiles = 1 << zoom;
        point.x = point.x * numTiles;
        point.y = point.y * numTiles;
        return point;
     }

    PointF fromPointToLatLng(PointF point, int zoom)
    {
        int numTiles = 1 << zoom;
        point.x = point.x / numTiles;
        point.y = point.y / numTiles;       

        double lng = (point.x - _pixelOrigin.x) / _pixelsPerLonDegree;
        double latRadians = (point.y - _pixelOrigin.y) / - _pixelsPerLonRadian;
        double lat = radiansToDegrees(2 * Math.atan(Math.exp(latRadians)) - Math.PI / 2);
        return new PointF(lat, lng);
    }

    public static void main(String []args) 
    {
        GoogleMapsProjection2 gmap2 = new GoogleMapsProjection2();

        PointF point1 = gmap2.fromLatLngToPoint(41.850033, -87.6500523, 15);
        System.out.println(point1.x+"   "+point1.y);
        PointF point2 = gmap2.fromPointToLatLng(point1,15);
        System.out.println(point2.x+"   "+point2.y);
    }
}

public final class PointF 
{
    public double x;
    public double y;

    public PointF(double x, double y)
    {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
great answer, thank you, you've helped me a lot. –  user1271518 Aug 28 '13 at 8:23

I'd like to point out that the code in the procedure bounds should read

    double bound(double val, double valMin, double valMax)
    {
        double res;
        res = Math.max(val, valMin);
        res = Math.min(res, valMax);
        return res;
    }
share|improve this answer
 public static String getTileNumber(final double lat, final double lon, final int zoom) {
 int xtile = (int)Math.floor( (lon + 180) / 360 * (1<<zoom) ) ;
 int ytile = (int)Math.floor( (1 - Math.log(Math.tan(Math.toRadians(lat)) + 1 /  Math.cos(Math.toRadians(lat))) / Math.PI) / 2 * (1<<zoom) ) ;
if (xtile < 0)
 xtile=0;
if (xtile >= (1<<zoom))
 xtile=((1<<zoom)-1);
if (ytile < 0)
 ytile=0;
if (ytile >= (1<<zoom))
 ytile=((1<<zoom)-1);
return("" + zoom + "/" + xtile + "/" + ytile);
 }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.