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Performance is of the utmost importance on this one guys... This thing needs to be lightning fast!


How would you validate the number of days in a given month?

My first thought was to make an array containing the days of a given month, with the index representing the month:

var daysInMonth = [
    31, // January
    28, // February
    31, // March
    etc.
];

And then do something along the lines of:

function validateDaysInMonth(days, month)
{
    if (days < 1 || days > daysInMonth[month]) throw new Error("Frack!");
}

But... What about leap years? How can I implement checking for leap years and keep the function running relatively fast?


Update: I'd like you guys to show me some code which does the days in month- leap year validation.

Here's the flowchart describing the logic used today:

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+1, the question led to some really nice tips and tricks :) –  Moayad Mardini Sep 16 '09 at 14:08
2  
but all this logic is already built in to the javascript engine... WHy recode it ? Unless it is just for exercise, you can use the javascript Date object: var daysInMonth = new Date(aDate.getYear(), 1+aDate.getMonth(), 0).getDate(); –  Charles Bretana Sep 16 '09 at 14:22
    
I'd like to see how something that is evenly divisible by 4 and by 100 is not divisible by 400. –  n1313 Sep 16 '09 at 14:43
    
@n1313: 4 x 25 = 100 –  Robert L Sep 16 '09 at 23:51

11 Answers 11

up vote 25 down vote accepted
function daysInMonth(m, y) { // m is 0 indexed: 0-11
    switch (m) {
        case 1 :
            return (y % 4 == 0 && y % 100) || y % 400 == 0 ? 29 : 28;
        case 8 : case 3 : case 5 : case 10 :
            return 30;
        default :
            return 31
    }
}

function isValid(d, m, y) {
    return m >= 0 && m < 12 && d > 0 && d <= daysInMonth(m, y);
}
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I think this is really cooL! Great! –  vpram86 Sep 16 '09 at 13:55
1  
The comment says that m is zero-indexed, but still your switch relies on the months being one-indexed; 1: January, 2: February, etc. –  roosteronacid Sep 16 '09 at 13:57
3  
There, fixed that for ya'. –  paxdiablo Sep 16 '09 at 14:01
1  
@rooster, I thought about that, but the only performance gain you'll get will be on those years which are divisible by 400, so unless you're working with a lot of dates in the year 2000 (or 2400), then no. –  nickf Sep 16 '09 at 23:18
1  
2010, current year? Can you like, email me lotto results or something?? –  nickf Sep 18 '09 at 14:27

I've been doing this using the Date object (assuming it's compiled, and hence blindingly fast compared to scripting).

The trick is that if you enter a too high number for the date part, the Date object wraps over into the next month. So:

var year = 2009;
var month = 1;
var date = 29;

var presumedDate = new Date(year, month, date);

if (presumedDate.getDate() != date)
    WScript.Echo("Invalid date");
else
    WScript.Echo("Valid date");

This will echo "Invalid date" because presumedDate is actually March 1st.

This leaves all the trouble of leap years etc to the Date object, where I don't have to worry about it.

Neat trick, eh? Dirty, but that's scripting for you...

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This looks like the best solution but is Date expected to do that in all implementation by ECMA standard? –  the_drow Sep 16 '09 at 14:00
1  
nice trick, and it's definitely a good idea to build on and use established things like the Date class, however I just did some benchmarks and this is significantly slower (+650%) than the method I proposed! –  nickf Sep 16 '09 at 14:02
    
+1 Really nice trick, Tor :) –  roosteronacid Sep 16 '09 at 14:03
    
+1 for the trick. Although it's not very friendly, I wouldn't be able to understand it without your explanation! –  Moayad Mardini Sep 16 '09 at 14:06

If the month isn't February, get the number from the array. Otherwise, check if the year is leap to return 29, or return 28. Is there a problem with that?

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This will not perform as well as the accepted answer. I threw this in here because I think it is the simplest code. Most people would not need to optimize this function.

function validateDaysInMonth(year, month, day)
{
    if (day < 1 || day > 31 || (new Date(year, month, day)).getMonth() != month)
        throw new Error("Frack!");
}

It takes advantage of the fact that the javascript Date constructor will perform date arithmetic on dates that are out of range, e.g., if you do:

var year = 2001; //not a leap year!
var month = 1 //February
var day = 29; //not a valid date for this year
new Date(year, month, day);

the object will return Mar 1st, 2001 as the date.

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I agree with Moayad and TED. Stick with the lookup table unless the month is February. If you need an algorithm for checking leap years, wikipedia has two:

if year modulo 400 is 0 then leap
 else if year modulo 100 is 0 then no_leap
 else if year modulo 4 is 0 then leap
 else no_leap

A more direct algorithm (terms may be grouped either way):

function isLeapYear (year):
 if ((year modulo 4 is 0) and (year modulo 100 is not 0)) or (year modulo 400 is 0)
  then true
 else false
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I'm mostly agreeing w/ Moayad. I'd use a table lookup, with an if check on February and the year.

pseudocode:

Last_Day = Last_Day_Of_Month[Month];
Last_Day += (Month == February && Leap_Year(Year)) ? 1 : 0;

Note that Leap_Year() can't be implemented simply as (Year % 4 == 0), because the rules for leap years are way more complex than that. Here's an algorithm cribbed from Wikipedia

bool Leap_Year (int year) {
   return ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0)) || (year % 400 == 0);
}
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function caldays(m,y)
{
    if (m == 01 || m == 03 || m == 05 || m == 07 || m == 08 || m == 10 || m == 12)
    {
        return 31;              
    }
    else if (m == 04 || m == 06 || m == 09 || m == 11)
    {
        return 30;        
    }
    else
    {    
        if ((y % 4 == 0) || (y % 400 == 0 && y % 100 != 0))
        {    
            return 29;          
        }
        else 
        {
            return 28;              
        }
    }    
}

source: http://www.dotnetspider.com/resources/20979-Javascript-code-get-number-days-perticuler-month-year.aspx

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Assuming the JS Date object standard where months are numbered from 0, and you have your daysInMonth array:

var days = daysInMonth[month] + ((month === 1) && (year % 4 === 0) && ((year % 100 !== 0) || (year % 400 === 0)));

will give you the number of days in the month, with 28 increased to 29 iff the month is February and the year is a leap year.

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all this logic is already built in to the javascript engine... Why recode it ? Unless you are doing this just as an exercise, you can use the javascript Date object:

Like this:

function daysInMonth(aDate) {
      return new Date(aDate.getYear(), aDate.getMonth()+1, 0).getDate();      
   }
share|improve this answer

You can use DateTime to solve this:

new DateTime('20090901')->format('t'); // gives the days of the month
share|improve this answer
    
Is this javascript ? –  Charles Bretana Sep 16 '09 at 19:59

Moment.js

Have you tried moment.js?

The validation is quite easy to use:

var m = moment("2015-11-32");
m.isValid(); // false

I don't know about the performances but hum the project is stared 11,000+ times on GitHub (kind of a quality guarantee).

Source: http://momentjs.com/docs/#/parsing/is-valid/

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