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I'm having a little problem to understand why python won't cast a float to an int. The following is a code snippet.

import time

now = time.time()
print type(now)
int(now)
print type(now)

And this is the result I get, I can't quite figure out why. Any ideas? Thanks in advance

<type 'float'>
<type 'float'>
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have to reassign now like so:

now = int(now)

The int() conversion does not operate in place - it merely returns the result of the conversion, which is why you need to reassign now to the new value.

As a general rule, functions return a new value, while methods operate in place. For the difference between functions and methods, see this question.

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Thanks a lot I couldn't quite understand why, now I do. –  haar Jan 15 '13 at 3:27
1  
The important thing to remember here is that int() is not a C-style cast; it's the int constructor and it returns an integer object, so you gotta store that somewhere. –  kindall Jan 15 '13 at 3:58
    
That explains why! I studied C till a couple of weeks ago. Thanks again. –  haar Jan 15 '13 at 4:59
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int() doesn't operate in-place. You still have to overwrite now:

now = int(now)

Although I'd just do it all at once:

now = int(time.time())
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You never set now to the int version

import time
now = time.time()
print type(now)
now = int(now) # set now to int version
print type(now)
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