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I am working on a personal project that hopefully will grow into something large and horrible...

I would like to derive the class that a string refers to even if it is not fully qualified. As nearly as possible I would like to reproduce the behavior of the JVM. E.g., in code I can refer to unqualified things that have been imported or are in the same package. I understand this may not be fully possible, but I would like to give it a go. My current code has the following issues:

  • It is slow. It generates a list of all the classes there are and looks for matches in it. Takes about 6 seconds on my machine. UPDATE: I altered the Reflection code to get a set of class names instead of classes. About twice as fast now.
  • Obviously this also means that I can have duplicate troubles. Is there a way to order the list the same way Java uses to disambiguate things? UPDATE This is the only serious issue left. At least I throw an exception now if an ambiguity it found.
  • I use the Google Reflection library to derive the class list. I use ClasspathHelper.forClassLoader() and ClasspathHelper.forJavaClassPath(), but I still may be missing some. UPDATE I am unioning four different class sets which seem to provide good coverage.
  • I am certainly missing java.*. This is because those classes are loaded by the primordial classloader and can be hard coded. They are therefore not available? As a last resort, is there a list of the classes in java.* in machine readable form that I could use to look them up? UPDATE http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/overview-summary.html seems the best option so far. Apparently I could also code a doclet which would output the javadocs in a machine readable form. Is there one already?

Anything other issues? Here's the current code:

/**
 * Attempts to return the class specified by a string even if the it is not
 * fully qualified.  It does this by going through all the classes there are.
 * Note: You may specify arrays in normal declaration form, e.g. myArray[][].
 * 
 * @param classString       The string rep of the class/type
 * @return                  The class I think it refers to
 */
private static Class<?> getClassOfString(String classString) {
    classString = convertTypeToCanonicalForm(classString);
    Matcher matcher = Pattern.compile("(\\[+(\\w))?((\\w+(\\.\\w+)*);?)?").matcher(classString);
    matcher.find();
    String arrayPrefix = matcher.group(2);
    String className = matcher.group(4);
    try {
        if (arrayPrefix == null || arrayPrefix.equals("L")) {
            String classFound = null;
            for (String clazz : getSetOfAllClasses()) {
                if (clazz != null) {
                    if (clazz.matches("(.*\\.)?"+Pattern.quote(className)))
                        if (classFound == null)
                            classFound = clazz;
                        else
                            throw new RuntimeException("Class name '" + className +
                                    "' is ambiguous: " + classFound + " vs " + clazz);
                }
            }
            if (classFound != null) {
                classString = classString.replaceAll(Pattern.quote(className), classFound);
                return Class.forName(classString);
            }
        }
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException();
    }

        if (arrayPrefix == null)
            if (className == "boolean") return(boolean.class);          // primitive types
            else if (className == "byte") return(byte.class);
            else if (className == "char") return(char.class);
            else if (className == "double") return(double.class);
            else if (className == "float") return(float.class);
            else if (className == "int") return(int.class);
            else if (className == "long") return(long.class);
            else if (className == "short") return(short.class);
            else if (className == "void") return(void.class);

        // hack for java.* types-- look 'em up
        if (className != null) {
            String prefixFound = null;
            for (String prefix : javaTypes.keySet())
                for (String type : javaTypes.get(prefix))
                    if ((prefix+"."+type).matches(".*" + className))
                        if (prefixFound == null)
                            prefixFound = prefix;
                        else
                            throw new RuntimeException("Class name '" + className +
                                "' is ambiguous: java." + prefixFound + "." + className +
                                " vs java." + prefix + "." + className);
            if (prefixFound == null) prefixFound = "util";      // temp hack
            classString = classString.replaceAll(Pattern.quote(className), 
                    "java." + prefixFound + "." + className);
        }

        try {
            return Class.forName(classString);
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException("Class '" + className + 
                    "' is unknown or somewhere in java.* that I don't know about");
        }
}

/**
 * Converts the type from standard declaration form to canonical internal form
 * if necessary.  Practically this just means doing array translation.
 * 
 * @param type
 * @return
 */
private static String convertTypeToCanonicalForm(String type) {
    Matcher matcher = Pattern.compile("^(\\w+(\\.\\w+)*)((\\[\\])+)$").matcher(type);
    if (matcher.find()) {
        String typeTemp = matcher.group(1);
        if (typeTemp.equals("boolean")) typeTemp = "Z";         // primitive typeTemps
        else if (typeTemp.equals("byte")) typeTemp = "B";
        else if (typeTemp.equals("char")) typeTemp = "C";
        else if (typeTemp.equals("double")) typeTemp = "D";
        else if (typeTemp.equals("float")) typeTemp = "F";
        else if (typeTemp.equals("int")) typeTemp = "I";
        else if (typeTemp.equals("long")) typeTemp = "J";
        else if (typeTemp.equals("short")) typeTemp = "S";
        else typeTemp = "L" + typeTemp + ";";

        matcher = Pattern.compile("\\[\\]").matcher(matcher.group(3));
        while (matcher.find())
            typeTemp = "[" + typeTemp;
        type = typeTemp;
    }
    return type;
}

/**
 * List of package classes for each prefix in the java.* domain
 */
@SuppressWarnings("serial") 
static final Map<String, List<String>> javaTypes = new HashMap<String , List<String>>() {{
    put("lang",         Arrays.asList(new String[]{"Boolean","Byte","Character","Class","Double",
            "Float","Integer","Long","Short","String","Void"}));
    // rest of java.* goes here
}};

/**
 * Gets and stores a set of all the classes we can find.  Missing the java.* domain.
 * Uses the Google Reflection library.
 * 
 * @return          The class set
 */
static Set<String> classStringSet = null;
private static Set<String> getSetOfAllClasses() {

    if (classStringSet == null) {
        List<ClassLoader> classLoadersList = new LinkedList<ClassLoader>();
        classLoadersList.add(ClasspathHelper.contextClassLoader());
        classLoadersList.add(ClasspathHelper.staticClassLoader());                      
        classLoadersList.add(ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader());                      
        Reflections reflections = new Reflections(new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .setScanners(new SubTypesScanner(false), new ResourcesScanner())
            .setUrls(ClasspathHelper.forClassLoader(classLoadersList.toArray(new ClassLoader[0]))));
        classStringSet = reflections.getStore().getSubTypesOf(Object.class.getName());

        reflections = new Reflections(new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .setScanners(new SubTypesScanner(false), new ResourcesScanner())
            .setUrls(ClasspathHelper.forJavaClassPath()));
        classStringSet.addAll(reflections.getStore().getSubTypesOf(Object.class.getName()));

    }

return classStringSet;
}

Why am I doing this? It'll be fun! You'll see.

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps better posted at code review? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 15 '13 at 3:35
    
Newbie here sorry-- I just read the faq for code review and I think this is premature for posting there. Thanks! –  pinecone Jan 15 '13 at 3:41
    
"...that hopefully will grow into something large and horrible...". Sounds like it would be a bad idea to help you :-) –  Stephen C Jan 15 '13 at 3:48
    
You're just saying that because someone bent your spoon. –  pinecone Jan 15 '13 at 3:59
1  
@pinecone - No the bent spoon means that it is "too difficult" to spoon-feed solutions ... to people to are too lazy (or dumb) to do their own programming. –  Stephen C Jan 15 '13 at 4:04

1 Answer 1

It is slow. It generates a list of all the classes there are and looks for matches in it. Takes about 6 seconds on my machine.

The implementation may be traversing all of the directories, and the indices of all of the archives on your classpath / bootclasspath. (Though 6 seconds does seem excessive ... unless you've got a monstrously large number of classes on your classpath.)

If it takes 6 seconds every time, you should consider caching the set of classnames in a suitable data structure.

Obviously this also means that I can have duplicate troubles. Is there a way to order the list the same way Java uses to disambiguate things?

Java doesn't disambiguate the names. If there is a collision it is a compilation error.

(Actually, I'm oversimplifying. The language has rules that govern the say that names are handled, but these rules largely depends on the import statements in your source code. Do you have something analogous to import statements in your use-case?)

I am certainly missing java.*. This is because those classes are loaded by the primordial classloader and can be hard coded. They are therefore not available?

You should be able to get hold of the system classloader using getSystemClassLoader()

share|improve this answer
    
The code does cache. It only takes time on the first call. There are about 7300 classes. The number is only that high because I'm in Eclipse. Running normally it's under 2000. –  pinecone Jan 15 '13 at 4:19
    
I assume the imports are long gone by runtime? I can't get a list of them? –  pinecone Jan 15 '13 at 4:20
    
I just tried adding ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader() to the classLoadersList but the number of classes found didn't increase. –  pinecone Jan 15 '13 at 4:26
    
"I assume the imports are long gone by runtime?" - yes. "I can't get a list of them?" - not unless you parse the source code. Imports are resolved at compile time and don't make it into the class files. –  Stephen C Jan 15 '13 at 5:20
    
If you don't model the full semantics name lookup in Java, I don't see how you can get a reliable result. What, for instance, should this produce for the string "Get"? What do you intend to use this answer for? –  Ira Baxter Jan 16 '13 at 1:00

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