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I have a question about how do we usually deal with threads conflict ? for example, if you are selling a book on a website, and there's only one available. The situation is that there are 2 clients (threads) want to buy that book and it happens that both place an order at the same time, so how do we deal with it ? and how do we avoid it ?

More specific, I have a servlet that takes request for the client, and I mean since we can't just make the doPost method synchronized, because that might lead to a performance issue as every request(thread) comes in.

class Server{

      private Library library = Library.getInstance();   //singleton for all books

      protected void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) 
                                                 throws ServletException, IOException {
              synchronized(library){
                    Book book = library.get(request.getParameter("book_name"));
                    if(book != null){
                          int copies = book.getAvailable();
                          book.setAvailable(copies-1);
                          placeOrder();
                    }

              }
      }
}
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Synchronization is not part of a method's public signature -- it's an implementation detail. So you can in fact make the doPost method synchronized. –  Tom G Jan 15 '13 at 4:34

6 Answers 6

If all library.get call returns same object (for the same book), you can synchronize the code using that object. Would be better than the whole library.

    class Server{

      private Library library = Library.getInstance();   //singleton for all books

      protected void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) 
                                                 throws ServletException, IOException {
             boolean isOkToPlaceOrder = false;
             Book book = library.get(request.getParameter("book_name"));

             synchronized(book){
                    if (book != null) {
                          copies = book.getAvailable();
                          book.setAvailable(copies-1);
                          isOkToPlaceOrder = true;
                    }
              }
              if (isOkToPlaceOrder) placeOrder();
      }
}

In the other hand, another idea is to synchronize the code with a unique String instance (using intern method).

     Book book = library.get(request.getParameter("book_name"));

     synchronized(book.getISBNString().intern()){
            // reload changes made by other thread
            book = library.get(request.getParameter("book_name"));
            if (book != null) {
                  copies = book.getAvailable();
                  // if copies < 1 --> Error message

                  book.setAvailable(copies-1);

                  // save changes in synch
                  ....
                  placeOrder();
            }
      }

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/String.html#intern() http://weblogs.java.net/blog/enicholas/archive/2006/06/all_about_inter.html

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The easiest way to deal with problems like that is to use the database to handle concurrency. any mainstream database has concurrency support baked in with years of development effort behind it. it's relatively easy to leverage the ACID support in the database to handle these kinds of standard business problems.

UPDATE:

As @MartinJames said so well in the comment below, i am not saying that "databases are the solution to all things concurrent". However, for "longer" lived interactions where you will already be updating a database and you need to control multiple bits of data in a "transactional" nature, the database is the perfect place to handle this level of concurrency.

Additionally, a variety of the other comments are showing how to manage this data in memory using java level concurrency. in this situation, however, the moment you need to "scale out" (i.e. add another app server), you are dead because java level synchronization will no longer work. the database solution, however, still works. this is why EJB stuff discourages using concurrency/synchronization directly. instead, most synchronization in the EJB/JPA world is handled in the database.

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so are you saying relying on database to handle the concurrency is better than writing code on server side for handle multi-threading request ? is that actually better in practice for building enterprise application ? –  user1389813 Jan 15 '13 at 4:40
1  
No, I don't think that @jtahlborn is reccommending a DB for all concurrent synchronization, but you example of buying a book generally involves user accounts, inventory control, invoicing and such like - a complex transaction spread over several web exchanges. 'Classic' kernel synchro, atomic operations etc. that can manage concurency in thread interactions are not appropriate to control overlapped, multi-step jobs that can take minutes to complete - hence database. –  Martin James Jan 15 '13 at 11:25

If you have control over the implementation of Book, then it should use

java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger

to hold the book count and expose a method

book.decAvailable()

or

book.buyCopies(23)

instead of

book.setAvailable().

Ultimately, this functionality should be provided by the Library (Book) class implementation.

Note: This still won't save you if another server instance in the cluster grabbed the last copy. The final arbiter will have to be the database, but at least using Atomics, you can reduce the likelihood of a false sale.

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Minor adjustment to what you already have. This will help since you won't be synchronising across the entire place order process...

class Server{

      private Library library = Library.getInstance();   //singleton for all books

      protected void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) 
                                                 throws ServletException, IOException {
             boolean isOkToPlaceOrder = false;
             synchronized(library){
                    Book book = library.get(request.getParameter("book_name"));
                    if (book != null) {
                          copies = book.getAvailable();
                          book.setAvailable(copies-1);
                          isOkToPlaceOrder = true;
                    }
              }
              if (isOkToPlaceOrder) placeOrder();
      }
}
share|improve this answer

There are a variety of ways. In terms of server side stuff in Java, the simplest is to utilize java monitors, i.e., use the synchronized keyword to protect shared variables. The better way would be perhaps use the java.util.concurrent classes to implement a producer/consumer paradigm e.g., using BlockingQueue's with executors.

Here's a simple example using the util.concurrent classes. Note that the Data class is your custom class.

    // This can go inside a main method or your controller class.
    private BlockingQueue<Data> sharedQueue = new ArrayBlockingQueue<Chunk>(BUFFER_SIZE);
    for (int i = 0; i < NUMBER_OF_PRODUCERS; i++) {
         (new Thread(new Producer(sharedQueue, i))).start();
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < NUMBER_OF_CONSUMERS; i++) {
          (new Thread(new Consumer(sharedQueue, i))).start();
    }


public class Producer implements Runnable {
    private final BlockingQueue<Data> sharedQueue;

    public Producer(BlockingQueue<Data> sharedQueue, int id) {
            this.sharedQueue = sharedQueue;
    }

    public void run() {
            try {
                 while (true) {
                       sharedQueue.put(produce());
                 }
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                    ex.printStackTrace();
            }
    }

    private Data produce() { return new Data(); }
 }

public class Consumer implements Runnable {

    private final BlockingQueue<Data> sharedQueue;

    public Consumer(BlockingQueue<Data> sharedQueue, int id) {
            this.sharedQueue = sharedQueue;
    }

    public void run() {
            try {
                 while (true) {
                       consume(sharedQueue.take());
                 }
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                    ex.printStackTrace();
            }
    }

    void consume(Data c) { System.out.println(c); }
}
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I just updated my question. does that look closely correct ? and how do you use producer/consumer (blocking queue) for doing that ? –  user1389813 Jan 15 '13 at 4:35
    
Check my updated answer for an example. –  Dhruv Gairola Jan 15 '13 at 4:44

There you need synchronization. If one client has started buying the book in a thread, the other client wanting to buy the book should wait until first is completed with buying or dropping the idea (rollback). One option to indicate to the end user is just display a message that it is being used, just wait or something like that. From implementation persepective, you need to know concurrency in java or database.

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