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As we know, IEEE floating point numbers can store exact representations of all integers and integer multiples of inverses-of-powers-of-two such as 1/2 or 3/4, as long the numbers keep within the range of the floating-point type.

However, do floating-point parsers generally guarantee exact results of parsing decimal representations of such numbers?

For instance, if I use 0.75 as a double literal in a C program, will the compiler guarantee that the compiled code contains the exact representation of 3/4, or is there a risk that it will produce the sum of some inexact representation of 0.7 and some inexact representation of 0.05?

Or, likewise, if I use 3e4 as a double literal, might the exact 3 be multiplied by some inexact representation of 2^(4*ln(10)/ln(2)) or some similar math?

Are there any standards that FP-parsers are generally required to follow in this matter, or is it generally left entirely to the implementation? If it is the latter, does anyone know how practically important implementations like GCC or glibc actually work?

I'm mostly just asking for curiosity and not because I want to rely on the behavior; but it might, at times, be quite convenient to know that FP equality comparisons are guaranteed to work if the values can be known to only come from literal sources.

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If you are specifically asking about C, you might want to tag your question c. (In which case, I am pretty sure the answer is no in theory, yes in practice.) –  Nemo Jan 15 '13 at 6:16
    
@Nemo: I wasn't asking about C specifically, though. I just used it as an example. –  Dolda2000 Jan 16 '13 at 0:59

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The C standard permits a floating-point constant to be either the representable value nearest to the exact value of the literal constants or the larger or smaller representable value immediately adjacent to the nearest value, per C 2011 6.4.4.2 3. Some C implementations do better. Modern implementations should do better, as there are published algorithms for doing the conversion correctly.

However, the C standard also provides for hexadecimal floating-point constants, which make it easy for a compiler to do the conversion correctly. A hexadecimal floating-point constant has the basic form 0xhhh.hhhpeee, where hhh are hexadecimal digits and eee is a decimal exponent, which may have a sign. (The hexadecimal digits one side may be omitted if they are zero, and the period may be omitted if the digits on the right are omitted.) The exponent is for a power of two.

The C standard requires that a hexadecimal floating-point constant be correctly rounded if the radix for floating-point numbers is a power of 2 in the C implementation. It recommends that a diagnostic message be produced if the hexadecimal constant cannot be represented exactly.

E.g., 0x3p-2 should be exactly .75.

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Nice answer. Do you happen to know if similar language appears in any C++ specification? –  Nemo Jan 16 '13 at 16:30
    
"or the larger or smaller representable value immediately adjacent to the nearest value" -- I take it, then, that the standard doesn't explicitly mention values that have an actual exact representation, and that it doesn't actually require them to be exactly represented? –  Dolda2000 Jan 16 '13 at 16:30
    
For the record, I tried giving GCC (with -Wall) the constant 0x19238192839183983p-10, and it did not produce a warning that it couldn't be exactly represented, even though it contains more significant digits than fit in a double. –  Dolda2000 Jan 16 '13 at 16:41
    
@Dolda2000: It sounds like you should file a bug report. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 16 '13 at 16:46

There is usually no guarantee to obtain in the Abstract Syntax Tree the nearest floating-point number to the decimal representation in the source code. A language standard such as C99 may specify that it has to be within one ULP (that is, not the nearest but one of the two nearest). In practice, a compiler may use the host's strtof(), strtod(),… functions, which again, are not specified as returning the nearest number, and indeed sometimes do not).

The within-one-ULP constraint implies that the exact decimal representation of a floating-point number should be converted to that number. However, many interpreters such as Ruby or Tcl come with their own strtod() in case the host does not have one. That implementation is horrible and may return a result that is wrong by several ULPs.

If you need to solve this by implementing your own conversion function, the outline for a simple, but correct, function based on big integers is on the Exploring Binary blog.


To summarize: for a language that specifies decimal-to-floating-point conversion to within one ULP, you should be fine for exact representations as long as you are using a quality compiler implementation. For interpreted languages with no such specification, either the host strtod() is called, in which case you should fine, or a horrible implementation is used, in which case you aren't.

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Mind you, I'm not primarily interested in how the result is rounded when inexact, but whether numbers that can be represented exactly are parsed as their exact representations. –  Dolda2000 Jan 15 '13 at 6:09
    
@Dolda2000 Yes, I did reframe the question a bit, but after this last edit I hope the answer to your original question is there too. By the way, “the sum of some inexact representation of 0.7 and some inexact representation of 0.05” is exactly why the “horrible implementation” is wrong, perhaps not for 0.75 but definitely for, say, 0.75e30. –  Pascal Cuoq Jan 15 '13 at 6:14
    
"The within-one-ULP constraint implies that the exact decimal representation of a floating-point number should be converted to that number." -- Does it? Aren't technically both the number above and the number below (exactly) within one ULP of the exact result? –  Dolda2000 Jan 16 '13 at 4:29
    
@Dolda2000 I meant strictly. But actually in C99 the wording is “either the nearest representable value, or the larger or smaller representable value immediately adjacent to the nearest representable value, chosen in an implementation-defined manner” which uses more words but, for exact values, has the same ambiguity as my formulation. –  Pascal Cuoq Jan 16 '13 at 14:24

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