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I am doing something similar to these railscast episodes:

http://railscasts.com/episodes/165-edit-multiple

http://railscasts.com/episodes/52-update-through-checkboxes

The problem is that those are only trying to modify the selected models. I need to update every single model.

The first thing I found out is that id not in () does not give back everything like I expected so I had to make a special case for the empty list.

This code works, but it doesn't seem very DRY. At the very least I should be able to merge the normal case into one line.

def update_published
  if params[:book_ids].empty?
    Book.update_all(published: false)
  else
    Book.where(id: params[:book_ids]).update_all(published: true)
    Book.where("id not in (?)", params[:book_ids]).update_all(published: false)
  end
  redirect_to books_path
end

Any ideas for improvement would be appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

Why not just do the following:

def update_published
  Book.update_all(published: false)
  Book.where(id: params[:book_ids]).update_all(published: true)
  redirect_to books_path
end

It'll be faster, and it's pretty straightforward and clean.

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Thanks. This is definitely an improvement in terms of the code. I think you're right that it'll be faster too since it doesn't need to do the same search twice. However, I am a bit concerned that it will update most models twice. –  Geoff Jan 15 '13 at 15:45

I finally figured it out.

def update_published
  Book.update_all(["published = id in (?)", params[:book_ids]])
  redirect_to books_path
end

I was trying to do something similar yesterday, but it kept giving me an error where the ? wasn't filled out and it was doing a where on my ids. Today, I finally realized I needed to wrap both parameters into an array.

One strange caveat about this is it messed up some of my specs. I was checking for false, but it was giving nil. In the database it seems to be set to false though. I changed my spec from be(false) to be_false and feel pretty safe now.

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I would not recommend writing your own sql. Then you will be bound to that specific DB type, though many have the same syntax. –  Cort3z Jan 26 '13 at 16:29

You could do it like this:

def update_published
    Book.transaction do
      Book.update_all(published: false)
      Book.scoped.find(params[:book_ids]).update_all(published: true) #Should be Lazyloaded. Testing Now
    end
end

Since it is a transaction it will be pretty fast. Also note how i use "find", and not "where". It is nicer in my opinion. Makes for slightly cleaner code.

NOTE: I would though question why you need to update every single book entity each time. Would it not be smarter to keep proper track of the published books one by one? You are bound to run into troubles if you need to pass every book ID in each time you want to update one single book. This solution isn't very scalable.

What you should have is this:

def publish_book(book)
  book.published = true;
  book.save!
end

Or even better:

#Book.rb
def publish
  self.published = true
  self.save #not 100% sure you need this. Anyone?
end

Whenever you can you (many agree) should follow the "skinny controller, fat model" approach. Meaning that you basicly put as much of the code inside the model class, and not anywhere else whenever you can spare it.

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That's an excellent point about wrapping it in a transaction. About find vs. where though I agree that find would be prettier, it doesn't work. find is going to execute the query (leaving me with an Array) whereas where keeps it as an ActiveRecord::Relation. I just tried it out and it gave an error because Array doesn't respond to update_all. –  Geoff Jan 26 '13 at 18:51
    
Ohh.. I was not aware that find fetches the data. Find some people saying that if you do "Book.scoped.find(whatever)", then it will be lazy. Have not tested it. –  Cort3z Jan 29 '13 at 15:53

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