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How do you convert Byte Array to Hexadecimal String, and vice versa?

I need an efficient and fast way to do this conversion. I have tried two different ways, but they are not efficient enough for me. Is there any other quick method to accomplish this in a real-time fashion for an application with huge data?

  public byte[] StringToByteArray(string hex)
    {
        return Enumerable.Range(0, hex.Length / 2).Select(x => Byte.Parse(hex.Substring(2 * x, 2), NumberStyles.HexNumber)).ToArray(); 
    }

The above one felt more efficient to me.

 public static byte[] stringTobyte(string hexString)
    {
        try
        {
            int bytesCount = (hexString.Length) / 2;
            byte[] bytes = new byte[bytesCount];
            for (int x = 0; x < bytesCount; ++x)
            {
                bytes[x] = Convert.ToByte(hexString.Substring(x * 2, 2), 16);
            }
            return bytes;
        }
        catch
        {
            throw;
        }
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marked as duplicate by Mitch Wheat, Niranjan Kala, Henk Holterman, Jon Egerton, CodesInChaos Jan 15 '13 at 10:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
The other question, although ostensibly about conversions in both directions, ends up focussing on the conversion from bytes to hex. This question is about the best conversion in the other direction, so FWIW, I think it adds something. –  JasonD Jan 15 '13 at 10:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I took the benchmarking code from the other question, and reworked it to test the hex to bytes methods given here:

HexToBytesJon: 36979.7 average ticks (over 150 runs)
HexToBytesJon2: 35886.4 average ticks (over 150 runs)
HexToBytesJonCiC: 31230.2 average ticks (over 150 runs)
HexToBytesJase: 15359.1 average ticks (over 150 runs)

HexToBytesJon is Jon's first version, and HexToBytesJon2 is the second variant. HexToBytesJonCiC is Jon's version with CodesInChaos's suggested code. HexToBytesJase is my attempt, based on both the above but with alternative nybble conversion which eschews error checking, and branching:

    public static byte[] HexToBytesJase(string hexString)
    {
        if ((hexString.Length & 1) != 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Input must have even number of characters");
        }
        byte[] ret = new byte[hexString.Length/2];
        for (int i = 0; i < ret.Length; i++)
        {
            int high = hexString[i*2];
            int low = hexString[i*2+1];
            high = (high & 0xf) + ((high & 0x40) >> 6) * 9;
            low = (low & 0xf) + ((low & 0x40) >> 6) * 9;

            ret[i] = (byte)((high << 4) | low);
        }

        return ret;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Weird, in my tests, my code is faster than Jon's, and Jon's two solutions have essentially the same speed. Are you running without debugger attached? –  CodesInChaos Jan 15 '13 at 10:23
    
Oops, I was running release, but with debugger. I'll amend the results! –  JasonD Jan 15 '13 at 10:25
    
I also changed ParseHex a bit, removing j and changing the termination condition of the loop. –  CodesInChaos Jan 15 '13 at 10:27
    
Yes, I've taken your updated code, it seems roughly the same, but I'll update the numbers. –  JasonD Jan 15 '13 at 10:30
1  
As far as I can tell, this doesn't detect invalid data. That may or may not be required by the OP, but I suspect it's relevant to performance. (There are far fewer branches in this code.) –  Jon Skeet Jan 21 '13 at 7:07

If you really need efficiency then:

  • Don't create substrings
  • Don't create an iterator

Or, and get rid of try blocks which only have a catch block which rethrows... for simplicity rather than efficiency though.

This would be a pretty efficient version:

public static byte[] ParseHex(string hexString)
{
    if ((hexString.Length & 1) != 0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Input must have even number of characters");
    }
    int length = hexString.Length / 2;
    byte[] ret = new byte[length];
    for (int i = 0, j = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        int high = ParseNybble(hexString[j++]);
        int low = ParseNybble(hexString[j++]);
        ret[i] = (byte) ((high << 4) | low);
    }

    return ret;
}

private static int ParseNybble(char c)
{
    // TODO: Benchmark using if statements instead
    switch (c)
    {
        case '0': case '1': case '2': case '3': case '4':
        case '5': case '6': case '7': case '8': case '9':
            return c - '0';
        case 'a': case 'b': case 'c': case 'd': case 'e': case 'f':
            return c - ('a' - 10);
        case 'A': case 'B': case 'C': case 'D': case 'E': case 'F':
            return c - ('A' - 10);
        throw new ArgumentException("Invalid nybble: " + c);
    }
    return c;
}

The TODO refers to an alternative like this. I haven't measured which is faster.

private static int ParseNybble(char c)
{
    if (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
    {
        return c - '0';
    }
    c = (char) c & ~0x20;
    if (c >= 'A' && c <= 'F')
    {
        return c - ('A' - 10);
    }
    throw new ArgumentException("Invalid nybble: " + c);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@MitchWheat: I suspect so - it creates a new string object for each byte. Even though the GC is pretty efficient, that's still extra work which really isn't required. –  Jon Skeet Jan 15 '13 at 7:05
    
@MitchWheat: I'll add a link to here... –  Jon Skeet Jan 15 '13 at 7:08
    
@MitchWheat: Thanks - return statement added. –  Jon Skeet Jan 15 '13 at 7:13
    
Yes it is faster, i have checked. –  Mask Jan 15 '13 at 8:01
    
In the if variant you can fold the tests for upper- and lowercase by using c & ~0x20 –  CodesInChaos Jan 15 '13 at 9:50

As a variant of Jon's if based ParseNybble:

public static byte[] ParseHex(string hexString)
{
    if ((hexString.Length & 1) != 0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Input must have even number of characters");
    }
    byte[] ret = new byte[hexString.Length / 2];
    for (int i = 0; i < ret.Length; i++)
    {
        int high = ParseNybble(hexString[i*2]);
        int low = ParseNybble(hexString[i*2+1]);
        ret[i] = (byte) ((high << 4) | low);
    }

    return ret;
}

private static int ParseNybble(char c)
{
    unchecked
    {
        uint i = (uint)(c - '0');
        if(i < 10)
            return (int)i;
        i = ((uint)c & ~0x20u) - 'A';
        if(i < 6)
            return (int)i+10;
        throw new ArgumentException("Invalid nybble: " + c);
    }
}
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