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I am now reading chapter 6 of the book Expert C Programming and very curious about the size of the data segment.

I wrote 3 programs to see the difference of the data segment.

My platform is MacBook Pro, OS X 10.8 and I use the command clang xxx.c to compile the code.

int main()
{
    int i, j;
    return 0;
}

__TEXT 4096 __DATA 0


int arr[10000];
int main()
{
    int i, j;
    return 0;
}

__TEXT 4096 __DATA 40960


int main()
{
    int i, j;
    int arr[10000];
    return 0;
}

__TEXT 4096 __DATA 4096

Why are the all three sizes different from each other?

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3 Answers 3

Unless you're writing program loaders, or working on embedded systems, there's really no need to care about the different segments.

However, the three classical standard segments are:

  • text, which contains the actual executable code
  • data, which contains initialized data (e.g. initialized global variables)
  • and bss, which contains uninitialized data (e.g. uninitialized global variables)

Variables that are local inside functions are placed on the stack during runtime, so have no specific segment.

These segments are often a multiple of the platforms page size, which on i386 and derivatives is 4096 bytes. Therefore even if only one byte is needed, the segment size is rounded up to 4096 bytes. In your second example you have 40000 bytes of data, this is rounded up to the nearest multiple of 4096 which is 40960.

If there is a bss segment, the data in it is often zeroed by the program loader. Another note about the bss segment, it actually doesn't use any space in the object or executable files. Since its data is uninitialized there is no need to store anything but the size in memory.

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How can I see the content of data segment? I used otool -d a.out but the output is a.out. –  Jiajun Jan 15 '13 at 7:15
    
@Jiajun otool seems to be the right command. For which example do you get the a.out output? Maybe it's the only thing in the data segment? –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 15 '13 at 7:20
    
For all the three, but the command otool -t a.out helps. –  Jiajun Jan 15 '13 at 7:27
    
After I add the initialization code int arr[1000] = { 1 }; to the global buffer, the otool -d works. I think the size program may consider the BSS segment as the data segment and there is no real data segment in fact. Thank you for your answer! –  Jiajun Jan 15 '13 at 7:40
    
@Jiajun It seems likely. I was actually rather surprised that the data segment would be that large for uninitialized data, as it would normally be in the bss segment. However both the data and bss segments contains data, which is why it might have been reported as a single "data" segment. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 15 '13 at 8:05

The text section is where the program text (or code) lives. So it makes sense that it would be constant across your three examples.

In the first, you have no global variables, no string literals, etc. So the data size is zero.

In your second example, you have a ~40 K global buffer, which goes in the data section (actually is probably BSS because it is uninitialized, and thus doesn't come along in the executable.)

In your third example, the buffer is on the stack of main(). You didn't add any global data though, so I'm not quite sure why its data size is nonzero.

Many executable formats will align these section sizes to something convenient for the system to execute. Intel x86 page size is 4KiB, which is why I suspect the linker is aligning these sections to 4096.

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In your second example the array is initialized statically, i.e. it exists for the full lifetime of the process. The linker reserves space for 10000 integers in the data section.

In your third example, the array gets created on the stack of the main() function, i.e. it does not exist at first, and gets initialized only after the process enters main() (which is not the same as "the full lifetime of the process", because there's runtime support code running before main(), and cleanup stuff running after it). The linker reserves space in the data section for something (I am not quite sure what), and the rest (4096 minus the size of the item reserved) is the effect of sections being page-aligned (i.e., assigned in multiples of the page size, 4k in this case).

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The last two sentences of your second paragraph are completely wrong. The buffer is uninitialized on the stack. Even if it were zeroed, it would with (hard-coded) instruction immediate values, not a zero in the data section. –  Jonathon Reinhart Jan 15 '13 at 7:12
    
@JonathonReinhart: On second thought, you are most likely correct. I have to admit I am not at all sure what gets put into the data section for the third example, but the size (4096) is definitely a page-aligning effect. –  DevSolar Jan 15 '13 at 8:10

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