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#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>
using namespace std;
class Base;
typedef void (Base::*function)();
class Base
{
public:
    function f;
    Base()
    {
        cout<<"Base Class constructor"<<endl;
    }
    virtual void g()=0;
    virtual void h()=0;
};
class Der:public Base
{
public:
    Der():Base()
    {
        cout<<"Derived Class Constructor"<<endl;
        f=(function)(&Der::g);
    }
    void g()
    {
        cout<<endl;
        cout<<"Function g in Derived class"<<endl;
    }
    void h()
    {
        cout<<"Function h in Derived class"<<endl;
    }
};
class Handler
{
    Base *b;
public:
    Handler(Base *base):b(base)
    {
    }
    void CallFunction()
    {
        cout<<"CallFunction in Handler"<<endl;
        (b->*f)();
    }
};
int main()
{
    Base *b =new Der();
    Handler h(b);
    h.CallFunction();
    getch();
}

I am getting an error while trying to call a member function in a derived class using function pointer declared in the base class. The function pointer is declared public and is actually used by another class Handler. I have used an unsafe typecast in this code. (function)(&Der::g). Is there any way to avoid it?

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1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/6754799/… - use Base::g instead, that cast you have is invalid. –  Mat Jan 15 '13 at 7:09
    
function f != pointer. So *f is incorrect. –  Laurence Jan 15 '13 at 7:30
    
@Laurence Thanks for the reply. But why is f not a pointer. Isn't it a function pointer. I am sorry, if this is a stupid question. –  sajas Jan 15 '13 at 7:55
    
Sorry, didn't read the code correctly. –  Laurence Jan 15 '13 at 8:01
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

f doesn't appear to be in scope in Handler::CallFunction. I'm guessing you meant to call the b->f using b as this, as it (b->*(b->f))(). When I make this change, your code compiles and prints out something sane.

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Thanks for the reply. It's working the way i want it. But I didn't understand why it was giving me the error earlier. Since f is a public member why can't i access it in Handler? What was happening when i had written (b->*f)()? –  sajas Jan 15 '13 at 7:59
2  
@sajas: Member pointer syntax is always confusing. In Handler, the name of the member is b->f, just like any other member variable. (A longer version would be function bf = b->f; b->*bf();.) The b->* sequence says "call one of b's member functions" but the thing after the "*" must be named from Handler's perspective, not b's - that arrow doesn't "reach inside" b. –  molbdnilo Jan 15 '13 at 8:33
    
@molbdnilo Thanks. –  sajas Jan 15 '13 at 8:46
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