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I'm not able to understand certain behavior while using -cp switch with javac. I have two java files in the directory C:\A\B\C> of a Windows 7 machine. The files are Extend.java and TestExtend.java; both belong to the package 'package com.gonni.profile'. I'm getting the following error:

C:\A\B>javac -d . -cp C\Extend.java
javac: no source files
Usage: javac <options> <source files>
use -help for a list of possible options

C:\A\B>javac -d . -cp 39#$%$fe#%#$%FF#$%GWE C\Extend.java

C:\A\B>javac -d . -cp  C\TestExtend.java
javac: no source files
Usage: javac <options> <source files>
use -help for a list of possible options

C:\A\B>javac -d . -cp 3458$^$%$%BF#W%V#$ C\TestExtend.java
C\TestExtend.java:6: cannot find symbol
symbol  : class Extend
location: class com.gonni.profile.TestExtend
    Extend exObj = new Extend();
    ^
C\TestExtend.java:6: cannot find symbol
symbol  : class Extend
location: class com.gonni.profile.TestExtend
    Extend exObj = new Extend();
                       ^
2 errors

C:\A\B>javac -d . -cp . C\TestExtend.java

C:\A\B>

Extend.java is :

package com.gonni.profile;

class Extend {
    class Inner {

    }
}

TestExtend.java is :

package com.gonni.profile;

class TestExtend {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Extend exObj = new Extend();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you imported Extend class in TestExtend class ? –  Jayamohan Jan 15 '13 at 7:52
1  
1) -cp expects an argument, you are omitting it in alot of your examples. 2) Your windows paths are incorrect 3) whats with the garbage characters you are supplying to -cp in examples 2 & 3? –  Perception Jan 15 '13 at 7:53
    
Thanks for quick answer. I realized my question is not complete and was about to edit... The java files are in C:\A\B\C and I'm giving the javac command from C:\A\B. What I'm not able to understand is, if I enter any random string of characters between -cp and the actual path - javac compiles otherwise not. YES, why can we enter any garbage argument with after -cp and why does -cp expect and argument; any links which explain your statement? –  vk7905 Jan 15 '13 at 8:38

3 Answers 3

I am sorry to say it but I do not understand what do you want to do: to compile your program or to make javac to fail?

  1. Path C\TestExtend.java seems wrong. Do you probably mean C:\TestExtend.java?
  2. What is 39#$%$fe#%#$%FF#$%GWE? Do you understand what does -cp mean?
  3. Your classes belong to package com.gonni.profile. It means that they must be under directory com/gonni/profile starting from your source root.
  4. You do not have to supply option -d .. This is a default.
  5. As far as I understand you have several (2 ?) classes without any external dependencies. This means that you do not have to use -cp (that means CLASSPATH) at all.

What to do?

  1. Create directory where your project is. Let's say C:\myproj.
  2. To simplify things for the beginning create directory structure according to your packages. For exampplee if your package is com.gonni.profile you should create directory C:\myproj\com\gonni\profile.
  3. Put your class(es) there.
  4. Open commend prompt and go to C:\proj
  5. Now run command javac com/gonni/profile/*.java

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for quick answer. I realized my question is not complete and was about to edit... The java files are in C:\A\B\C and I'm giving the javac command from C:\A\B. What I'm not able to understand is, if I enter any random string of characters between -cp and the actual path - javac compiles otherwise not. –  vk7905 Jan 15 '13 at 8:34
    
Thanks for all your help. What I wanted to achieve with -cp is compile inter-dependent java files spread across multiple folders or are java files in one folder; while we try to use javac from an abstract location. This means the directory structure being C:\A\B\C and we write javac command in some arbitrary location say C:\Users\vk where java files are in folders C:\A, C:\A\B and C:\A\B\C. Can you explain how this can be achieved? –  vk7905 Jan 15 '13 at 10:32

Your source files in this case should be under directory C:\A\B\C\com\gonni\profile - not directy in C:\A\B\C. Option -cp specifies path(s) to look up other compiled classes - not the source files.

Use -sourcepath instead if you want to specify location of source tree:

    javac -sourcepath C C/com/gonni/profile/TestExtend.java
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for quick answer. I realized my question is not complete and was about to edit... The java files are in C:\A\B\C and I'm giving the javac command from C:\A\B. What I'm not able to understand is, if I enter any random string of characters between -cp and the actual path - javac compiles otherwise not. The purpose of the code is to create the directory by itself as java files include package statements. –  vk7905 Jan 15 '13 at 8:41
    
-cp option (classpath) has no effect on compiling your application. the value of that option is not used in your case, because you're not using any external classes that are outside your package. If you feed garbage to it, compiler simply won't be able to find additional external classes. –  Cozzamara Jan 15 '13 at 8:46
    
Thanks. How would I have mentioned classes that are outside my package? Also, from what 'Perception' said above -cp always requires an argument - why is this the case? and where can I look for additional documentation about -cp always requiring an argument? –  vk7905 Jan 15 '13 at 9:02
    
Javac documentation is available here: docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/tools/windows/… –  Cozzamara Jan 15 '13 at 9:15
    
Thanks for all your help. What I wanted to achieve with -cp is compile inter-dependent java files spread across multiple folders or are java files in one folder; while we try to use javac from an abstract location. This means the directory structure being C:\A\B\C and we write javac command in some arbitrary location say C:\Users\vk where java files are in folders C:\A, C:\A\B and C:\A\B\C. Can you explain how this can be achieved? –  vk7905 Jan 15 '13 at 10:29

Javac requires to list ALL files it must compile in the command line. You cannot just list one and except it to autodiscover others. As a result, large, real world projects are very difficult to build that way. Also, fix a couple of small errors others have already pointed out.

Hence learn Eclipse, NetBeans or the like for IDE-based development or learn Maven, Ant, Make or the like if you want to become a command line master. It is uncommon just to call javac directly at these times.

share|improve this answer
    
Very true, but I'm learning core java and preparing for certification. Its best to start with command line before moving to an IDE. –  vk7905 Jan 15 '13 at 8:33

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