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I try to achieve the following: I have an interace called IAxis that forces my class TheAxis to have certain methods. In addition I want to implement some kind of abstract class based on a parameter. To explain this will write it down in code:

class TheAxis : IAxis
{
     public TheAxis(){ }

     public void IMoveToPos(int pos) {} //This is forced by the Interface


}

As the instance of this class is called it should be able to choose which methods to include, similar to virtual methods but not overriding existing methods but adding already coded ones from another class. I am looking for something like this:

abstract class GateAxis
{
    public void CloseGate() { IMoveToPos(0); }
}

abstract class XAxis
{
    public void MoveToStart() { IMoveToPos(100); }
}

TheGateAxis = new Axis() as GateAxis;

Now I want to be able to use TheGateAxis.Closegate(); but NOT TheGateAxis.MoveToStart();

if I call

TheXAxis = new Axis() as XAxis;

I want to be able to use TheXAxis.MoveToStart(); but NOT TheXAxis.CloseGate();

The Methods Given in XAxis or GateAxis don´t need any methods from TheAxis except the onces given by the interface.

Is it possible to do somethign like that? To add Methods to a class depending on a parameter given while instancing the class?

I hope you get what I am trying to do as I do hard to explain.

Best, Kevin

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure I understand. If you know which class you want to use during initialization then why don't you declare it as a variable of this class. For example: XAxis TheXAxis = new XAxis(); –  default locale Jan 15 '13 at 8:29
4  
Are you coming from VB? In C#, you don't specify the created class by using as GateAxis, you should rather use the right constructor: new GateAxis() –  Botz3000 Jan 15 '13 at 8:30
    
Hi, no am not coming from VB. The "as idea" came to my mind searching for a solution and finding virtual classes. i just used the notation. i dont want to use XAxis TheXAxis = new XAxis(); as i would need to declare MoveToPos(int pos) in all different classes, although they are excatly the same. I have like 6 or 7 types of Axes in my Program and defining the same Method 6 or 7 times exactly the same way seems as bad practice to me. In addition the code will be hard to edit later (as you need to change the code everywhere) –  Kevin Jan 15 '13 at 8:34
2  
@Kevin the as operator is only for casting. Unless you also use the constructor of GateAxis or a derived type, it will return null. In this case you should remove it completely. –  Botz3000 Jan 15 '13 at 8:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, if you want classes sharing few methods from a base class, and other being separate, you could do

//an interface (optional)
public interface IAxis {
   void MoveToPos(int pos);
}

public abstract class AxisBase : IAxis {
   public void MoveToPos(int pos) {
      //implementation
   }
}

//optionally you can do an IGateAxis interface, inheriting (or not) from IAxis
public interface IGateAxis : IAxis {
   void CloseGate();
}

//classes inheriting from AxisBase, implementing IGateAxis
public class GateAxis : AxisBase, IGateAxis {
   public void CloseGate() {
      MoveToPos(0);
   }
}
//another interface, not inheriting from IAxis
public interface IXAxis {
   void MoveToStart();
}

//another class inheriting from AxisBase
public class XAxis : AxisBase, IXAxis {
   public void MoveToStart() {
     MoveToPos(100);
   }
}

usage

var gateAxis = new GateAxis();
gateAxis.CloseGate();
//and you can do
gateAxis.MoveToPos(250);

var xAxis = new XAxis();
xAxis.MoveToStart();
//and you can do
xAxis.MoveToPos(40);

with the IGateAxis interface

IGateAxis gateAxis = new GateAxis();
gateAxis.CloseGate();
gateAxis.MoveToPos(1);

with the IXAxis interface

 IXAxis xAxis = new XAxis();
 gateAxis.MoveToStart();
 //but you can't do 
 //gateAxis.MoveToPos(10);
//as IXAxis doesn't know about this method.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is close to what I am looking for. One more question: can I force XAxis: AxisBase to implement methods by in interface? Soemthing like: XAxis : AxisBase,IAxis so XAxis includes the functions of AxisBase AND is forced to have additional methods by the Interface? –  Kevin Jan 15 '13 at 8:55
    
@Kevin AxisBase implements IAxis, GateAxis inherits from AxisBase, so GateAxis "is also" an IAxis. You can also create an IGateAxis interface, inheriting from IAxis (inheritance work also on interfaces) if you want, and make GateAxis implementing IGateAxis. –  Raphaël Althaus Jan 15 '13 at 9:01
    
@Kevin edited answer for a sample with an inherited interface. –  Raphaël Althaus Jan 15 '13 at 9:05
    
Thanks Raphael! Just saw your additions! Thanks this is a smooth solution. –  Kevin Jan 15 '13 at 9:06
    
@Kevin : Yes, or keep IAxis with "MoveToPos" method, and an IXAxis interface, not inheriting from IAxis, for example. –  Raphaël Althaus Jan 15 '13 at 9:08

Dynamically adding methods, and removing them is not something that you can do in "normal" C# . There is no any OOP pattern that can simulate this.

What you can do, is using ExpandoObject to be able to achieve exactly what you're trying to achieve.

Represents an object whose members can be dynamically added and removed at run time.

By the way I would not encourage of using it as you are in statical type language domain, so may be it's a godd idea to revise your architectiure a little bit and don't jump in dynamic language domain using C#.

share|improve this answer
    // super class
    abstract class TheAxis : IAxis {
        public TheAxis() { }

        public void IMoveToPos(int pos) { } //This is forced by the Interface


    }


    abstract class GateAxis : TheAxis {
        public virtual void CloseGate() { IMoveToPos(0); }
    }

    abstract class XAxis : TheAxis {
        public virtual void MoveToStart() { IMoveToPos(100); }
    }

Now if you derive a class from GateAxis it'll only have access to the interface methods and the methods from GateAxis. Same goes for TheAxis.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, unless OP has a very good reason otherwise I believe this is what he's after. The two derived classes probably shouldn't be abstract as he seems to want to instantiate them. –  Rawling Jan 15 '13 at 8:35
1  
Yup, but the OP's question is unclear so assumptions are going to be made. –  Quinton Bernhardt Jan 15 '13 at 8:36
    
Some times I am just too blind to see the obvious... Thanks! Does this work with instantiating classes too? So I can call XAxis TheXAxis = new XAxis? I think I just need to skip the abstract, don´t I? –  Kevin Jan 15 '13 at 8:44
    
Yeah, sorry - deleted my prev comment cos i didn't read yours properly!. Just remove abstract and it'll work. –  Quinton Bernhardt Jan 15 '13 at 9:02

I think the best way to solve this is to use interfaces and a single (base) class.

public interface IAxis {
    void MoveToPos(int pos);
}

public interface IGateAxis {
    void CloseGate();
}

public interface IXAxis {
    void MoveToStart();
}

public class TheAxis : IAxis, IGateAxis, IXAxis {
     public TheAxis(){ }
     void IAxis.MoveToPos(int pos) {} 
     void IGateAxis.CloseGate() { ((IAxis)this).MoveToPos(0); }
     void IXAxis.MoveToStart() { ((IAxis)this).MoveToPos(100); }
}

IGateAxis gateAxis = new ThisAxis();
gateAxis.CloseGate();

IXAxis xAxis = new ThisAxis();
xAxis.MoveToStart();

This way you can specify which methods are available to certain types of axis. Also, you could force the creation of axis through a factory pattern, or even a single static method, just to facilitate the creation of axis.

share|improve this answer
    
explicit interface implementations must not have an explicit access modifier (public void IAxis.MoveToPos(...)) ^_^ –  Nuffin Jan 15 '13 at 8:39
    
Correct, forgot to remove it with IAxis implementation. –  Maarten Jan 15 '13 at 8:41

Assuming you have more than 3 methods, the easiest way that I see is to simply create a proxy that acts as a chain of responsibility:

public class AxisProxy : IAxis
{
    public AxisProxy(params IAxis[] implementations) {
        this.implementations = implementations;
    }

    private IAxis[] implementations;

    public virtual void CloseGate()
    { 
        foreach (var item in implementations) 
        {
            try { item.CloseGate(); } catch (NotSupportedException) {}
        }
        throw new NotSupportedException();
    }

    public virtual void MoveToStart() 
    {
        foreach (var item in implementations) 
        {
            try { item.MoveToStart(); } catch (NotSupportedException) {}
        }
        throw new NotSupportedException();
    }
}

You can create a base implementation of Axis to make sure all default implementations throw the exception. Derived implementations implement specific functionality.

You can then use it by simply calling

IAxis myAxis = new AxisProxy(new GateAxis(), new XAxis());

NOTE: In this case I would seriously consider changing the types to 'bool'; if you call these methods frequently, exception performance will add up... Also, since the NotSupportedException is not going to change, you can keep a per-method list to remove implementations that throw.

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