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On my page I have few blocks (div) that have the same style regarding background and border (menu panel, info panel, footer panel, ...).

Now I would like to write that style only once and not repeat it for every panel. Yet I don't see any comfortable way of doing that.


One approach I investigated was to introduce a dedicated class (for example panelClass) that would capture the common panel styles. Then in (X)HTML I would just add that class to every element that is supposed to be a panel.

But this doesn't feel right. After all I would be "revealing implementation" in the (X)HTML. I'm no longer able to transparently change things easily because that requires modification of the (X)HTML.

Not to mention that it introduces issues with order of the classes (and thus order in which CSS attributes will be overwritten if needed).

EDIT: (an extended explanation for kolin's answer)

By “revealing implementation” I meant that the (X)HTML (“the content”) is much more strongly connected to the CSS (“the presentation”) than I would like them to be. Maybe I’m pursuing an unreachable ideal (maybe even an unreal or a dummy one!) but I’m trying to keep “the content” separate from “the presentation”.

Thus having a class menu isn’t bad because it describes “contents” not “presentation”. While using instead (what I understood from the cited articles and few others on that site) classes like menu box bordered left_column is bad because it mixes presentation with contents. Once you start adding such classes you might very well add that CSS directly to style attribute. It sure would be much more work and an unmaintainable result but conceptually (when regarding contents-presentation separation) it wouldn’t make a difference.

Now I do realize that in real life for real pages (rich and nice) it is virtually impossible to keep contents entirely separate from presentation. But still you may (should?) at least try to.

Also just look at the “But” in the end of the article The single responsibility principle applied to CSS. In my opinion the island class he used is already presentational because it does not describe contents. It describes how to show it. And that is immediately obvious once you see how widely he used (or might have used) that class on elements having nothing in common as regarding contents.

END EDIT


Another approach was to use selectors grouping. So I would have something like:

#menu, #info, #footer {
  background: /* ... */
  border: /* ... */
}

This avoids the need to modify (X)HTML. But still causes order issues. And also makes it hard to group styles logically. Especially if they are distributed among many files.


I think that what I really would like to have is to be able to name a group of attributes and just import them somehow in selectors. Something like #include in C++ for example. Is there any way to achieve this? I doubt it but maybe...

If not then is there any other method?

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2  
You also could use Less lesscss.org –  Ron van der Heijden Jan 15 '13 at 9:22
    
I think that the best solution is this one with selectors grouping - it's clear and natural. I don't agree that it cause order issues. –  psur Jan 15 '13 at 10:04

2 Answers 2

Using classes to define styles is the correct way to do it.

One approach I investigated was to introduce a dedicated class (for example panelClass) that would capture the common panel styles. Then in (X)HTML I would just add that class to every element that is supposed to be a panel.

For me this is exactly the way I would do it.

But this doesn't feel right. After all I would be "revealing implementation" in the (X)HTML.

is there a security problem with revealing implementation?

A few selected posts from Harry Roberts :

http://csswizardry.com/2012/04/my-html-css-coding-style/

http://csswizardry.com/2012/04/the-single-responsibility-principle-applied-to-css/

http://csswizardry.com/2012/05/keep-your-css-selectors-short

I find his style of using CSS eye opening, and it may help you

update

Following on from your update, I agree with you that you should try and seperate structure from presentation, although there will be times where we can't quite manage it. Whether it is fully possible or not, i don't know.

I partially disagree about the island class, the padding property to me kind of hovers over the border of structural and presentational. structural because it alters the layout of whatever element it is applied to, presentational because the padding alters how it looks on the page.

in an ideal world you should never need a class attribute that encompasses menu box bordered left_column, because you would write a couple of classes that seperate out the structure and presentation.

thinking about your case I might create a panel class .panel{ margin:10px 0; padding: 10px; display:block }

and a panel-display class

.panel-display{ background-color:#1111e4 } .panel-display > a{ color:#fff }

in this way I could just play with the presentation without affecting the structure of the site. (n.b. I'm not sure if this helps you in anyway!, it just seems logical to me)

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I have extended my question explaining more on the "revealing implementation". –  Adam Badura Jan 15 '13 at 13:28

Searching Google for OOCSS (object oriented CSS) might help you in this case.

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