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I'd like to insert the line

<hr />

above every occurrence of a header 2 line in a file - e.g., above this pattern

<h2>variable pattern here</h2>

So the above should become

<hr />
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>

How can I do this with Vim, Sed or Perl?

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1  
Have you tried anything yourself? –  mpe Jan 15 '13 at 11:23
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6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

With sed you could do sed '/<h2>/i <hr />':

$ cat file
<html>
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>
<h3>not here</h3>
<h2>heading</h2>
<h2>Something</h2>

$ sed '/<h2>/i <hr />' file
<html>
<hr />
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>
<h3>not here</h3>
<hr />
<h2>heading</h2>
<hr />
<h2>Something</h2>

The first part /<h2>/ matches line containing <h2> and the second part uses the i command to insert <hr /> above the matched line.

A nice option with sed is -i this save the changes back to the file instead of printing to stdout but be sure that the changes are correct first.

sed -i '/<h2>/i <hr />' file
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Could you explain how that works, i.e. what the /i does, please? –  simbabque Jan 15 '13 at 9:43
1  
@sudo_O Works great. Thank you sir! –  woollybrain Jan 15 '13 at 9:45
    
Will do, but have to wait another 6 minutes –  woollybrain Jan 15 '13 at 9:47
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perl -plne 'print "<hr />" if(/\<h2\>variable pattern here\<\/h2\>/)' your_file

Input file:

> cat temp
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>
1
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>
2
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>
3
4
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>

Now the execution

> perl -plne 'print "<hr />" if(/\<h2\>variable pattern here\<\/h2\>/)' temp
<hr />
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>
1
<hr />
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>
2
<hr />
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>
3
4
<hr />
<h2>variable pattern here</h2>

This will just output to the console. If you want to change it inplace:

perl -pi -lne 'print "<hr />" if(/\<h2\>variable pattern here\<\/h2\>/)' your_file
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1  
There's never a reason to use both -p and -n. You want -p here. And I can't see that -l is doing anything useful here either. Also your regex is far more complex than it needs to be :-/ –  Dave Cross Jan 17 '13 at 9:33
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Command line solution in Perl.

perl -i~ -p -e'/<h2>/ and $_ = "<hr />\n$_"' your_file.html

Explanation of command line flags:

  • -i In-place editing (replace existing file), back-up to your_file.html~
  • -p Print each line in the file
  • -e Code to execute for each line in the file

If the line contains (/<h2>/) then prepend <hr /> to it (the current line is in $_).

But have you considered if this is the best approach? If you want to add a line above every H2 element, then perhaps you should do that with CSS?

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use strict;
use warnings;
use Tie::File;

tie my @file, 'example.html'
  or die "Unable to tie file: $!";

@file = map { m!<h2>.*</h2>!
            ? ( "<hr />", $_ )
            : $_ } @file;

untie @file;
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One of the many ways to do that in Vim:

:g/h2/norm O<hr /><CR>

Breakdown:

  1. :g[lobal] acts on every line that match a pattern, see :h :global.

  2. h2 the pattern we are looking for, it could be made a bit smarter, probably.

  3. norm[al] runs a normal mode command, see :h :normal.

  4. O opens a new line above the current line and enters insert mode.

  5. <hr /> is what you want to insert.

  6. We hit <CR> (<RETURN>) to run the whole thing.

Another way, using a single substitution:

:%s/^\s*<h2/<hr \/>\r&<CR>

Breakdown:

  1. :%s[ubstitute]/ performs the substitution on every line of the buffer, see :h :s.

  2. ^ anchors the pattern to the beginning of the line.

  3. \s* matches any number (0 to many) of white space characters. It is not strictly needed if you are sure that all your HTML tags are on column 1.

  4. <h2 is the pattern we are really looking for.

  5. <hr /> is what we want to insert.

  6. Since we want it to be on its own line, it is followed by a \r,

  7. and, finally, the matched text, &.

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vim way:

cmd :g/<h2>/normal O<hr /> will do the job.

see it here: (I took the example from sudo_O)

enter image description here

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Forgot the link? –  iiSeymour Jan 15 '13 at 9:53
    
oops.. thx sudo –  Kent Jan 15 '13 at 9:55
1  
+1 for the animated gif. –  mpe Jan 15 '13 at 11:22
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