Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
“Least Astonishment” in Python: The Mutable Default Argument

I just want to check that the way I'm expecting this to work is correct or not. Here is a simplified version of a class I'm writing:

class Foo(object):
     def __init__(self):
         pass
     def bar(self, test1=[], test2=[]):
         if test2:
             test1.append(1)
         print test1

Now, to me, test1 and test2 - unless set - should always be set as empty lists when the function bar is called. This means that when test1 is printed, there should only ever be one item in the list (provided you only give one item as an argument). However, this is not the case:

>>> i = Foo()
>>> i.bar()
[]
>>> i.bar(test2=[1])
[1]
>>> i.bar()
[1, 1]
>>> i.bar(test2=[1])
[1, 1, 1]

In this case, you'd expect a similar result using integers:

class Foo(object):
     def __init__(self):
         pass
     def bar(self, test1=0, test2=0):
         if test2:
             test1 += 1
         print test1

But here, test1 is always set to 0:

>>> i = Foo()
>>> i.bar()
0
>>> i.bar(test2=1)
1
>>> i.bar(test2=1)
1
>>> i.bar(test2=1)
1

It seems that the list is persistent in the function or class's namespace, but the integer is not.

This may be a misunderstanding on my part, so would just like some clarification.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Lev Levitsky, Constantinius, glglgl, Daniel Roseman, soulcheck Jan 15 '13 at 10:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Here is a good explanation of the issue: deadlybloodyserious.com/2008/05/default-argument-blunders –  Constantinius Jan 15 '13 at 9:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The default arguments of a function are set when the function is declared, not every time you call the function. Therefore the list that is made when the function is declared is only made once, and is referenced every other time you called the function. See also this question.

Because lists are mutable, when you change them, anything that references it changes as well. However integers are immutable (they can't be changed), so when you reassign a variable to another integer, only that variable changes, because it is referencing a different object.

share|improve this answer
1  
What is the compile time in Python? –  Constantinius Jan 15 '13 at 9:51
    
@Constantinius I meant when the function was declared, see the edit –  Volatility Jan 15 '13 at 9:53
    
This makes sense, but why does it differ between the list and integer example? –  jdborg Jan 15 '13 at 9:55

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.