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I have a structure and want to increase an array size whenever SendMessage function calls

struct MQStruct {
    wchar_t *serviceName; 
    int durability; 
    int msgType; 
    int msgHeader; 
    wchar_t *msgId; 
    wchar_t *payload; 
    int payloadSize; 
    int ttl; 
    int priority;
}MQStructObj[1];


int SendMessage(wchar_t *serviceName, int durability, int msgType, int msgHeader, wchar_t *msgId, wchar_t *payload, int payloadSize, int ttl, int priority) {

//Want to add one more array object and also preserve data of previous
MQStructObj[MAX+1]

return 0;
}
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7  
Use a std::vector. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 15 '13 at 9:59
    
This looks like a C question, is it? –  Karthik T Jan 15 '13 at 10:00
    
and std::wstring instead of wchar_t*. –  hmjd Jan 15 '13 at 10:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In C you will have to deal with dynamic memory (i.e allocate the array using malloc(), then take care to call free() when you stop using it etc.) yourself, and possibly use realloc() to grow an allocation.

In C++ the problem is already solved for you and you have std::vector. You may call push_back to add elements dynamically to it.

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1  
realloc(), not reallocate() and malloc(), not alloc(). –  hmjd Jan 15 '13 at 10:00
    
And this is C and C++, not c or c++. –  kmkaplan Jan 15 '13 at 10:01
    
@hmjd gosh, thanks. I really am still sleeping –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 15 '13 at 10:01
    
@kmkaplan that is why I answered what are the OP's options in either case. If there is way to improve the answer please say so and I will try to do it. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 15 '13 at 10:02
    
@IvayloStrandjev Sorry, I must have been unclear. I mean that the typography of the names C and C++ is wrong in your answer. You write them in lower case and with code-like font instead of upper case and normal font. You wrote c where it is supposed to be C and c++ instead of C++. Just a minor nitpick anyways. –  kmkaplan Jan 15 '13 at 10:07

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