Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the below code I am getting a Null Reference Exception error while using "Names.Add(string)" method. But when I use a static class or a static object of the NamedDB class it works fine. Can any one explain how object instances work in ASP.Net web applications ? Why am I getting errors in nonstatic objects while static objects are working fine ?

public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page
{

   NameDB Names; //Creating Object

    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (!Page.IsPostBack)
        {
            Names = new NameDB();//Instantiation
        }
    }

    protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        Names.Add("dss");//Object Reference is null

        GridView1.DataSource = Names.GetName();
        GridView1.DataBind();
    }
}


    //NamedDB class

    public class NameDB
    {
        List<string> Names=new List<string>();

        public void Add(string item)
        {
            Names.Add(item);
        }

        public string Remove(string item)
        {

            Names.Remove(item);
            return item;
        }

        public List<string> GetName()
        {

            return Names;
        }

    }
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You do not have instances of global object which are instantiated before post back. Instantiate the object again in Button1_Click

Now You would be expecting the collection to hold data between post back but you wont get it until you store it some where like database, files,session, viewstate or cache for data. Session and ViewState are not meant for storing that type of data though.

protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Names = new NameDB();//Instantiation
    Names.Add("dss");//Object Reference is null
    GridView1.DataSource = Names.GetName();
    GridView1.DataBind();
}
share|improve this answer
    
But this way you will never get more than that single "dss" name, because the "NameDB" is recreated for every call. –  Hans Kesting Jan 15 '13 at 10:38
    
Thanks Adil, Can you please also tell me how it works in case of static ? if "static NameDB Name" it works. –  Mazhar Khan Jan 15 '13 at 11:09
    
I understand that static collection will be same for all users. I want to know how static saves in memory in case of WEB. –  Mazhar Khan Jan 15 '13 at 11:26
    
You can use cache but you should be careful about the size of data you need to store, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6hbbsfk6(v=vs.100).aspx –  Adil Jan 15 '13 at 11:31

Replace this:

NameDB Names; //Creating Object

by this

NameDB Names = new NameDB(); //Creating Object
share|improve this answer

You can do any of following

public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page
{
   NameDB Names= new NameDB();//Creating Object
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (!Page.IsPostBack)
        {
        }
    }
    protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        Names.Add("dss");

        GridView1.DataSource = Names.GetName();
        GridView1.DataBind();
    }
}

or

public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page
{
   NameDB Names;//Creating Object
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (!Page.IsPostBack)
        {
        }
    }
    protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Names = new NameDB();//Instantiation
        Names.Add("dss");

        GridView1.DataSource = Names.GetName();
        GridView1.DataBind();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is that the page-object is recreated for every request. So page-level fields are re-initialized for every call. And a postback is just another request!

If you want to persist values between requests, you need to find some way to store these. Some options are:

  • In a real database, takes some work but you have full control and full persistence
  • In Cache or Application, for application-wide storage where every visitor gets the same values, but these are lost when the app recycles.
  • In Session, for user-specific storage as long as the session doesn't time out (and the app doesn't recycle)
  • In ViewState, for "postback-specific" storage: this will keep values through postbacks to the same page (user-specific), but are lost when the user goes to another page.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.