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I have been wondering whether an extern can be declared locally and a register variable. If it can be what would be the restrictions imposed?

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You only are allowed to define a global variable as extern. Telling the compiler (and linker) that it is defined elsewhere.

A local variable only exist in the local scope, as it is created on the stack or in a register. When the execution is not in the scope (anymore) the stack is unrolled (so free space becomes available again) or the register is used for other things, and the variable does not exist (anymore).

So defining a local extern would be 'weird' and impossible (due to the stack usage).

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Well technically you don't 'make it extern' but more tell the compiler that this variable isn't defined in this file? – Jite Jan 15 '13 at 10:33
    
Hm... you are right. You define a variable extern to tell the compiler that it is created somewhere else already and that the linker need to find it while linking, so it can be used (even though not explicitly defined in the source file that is using it). I updated my answer, to make it more clear! – Veger Jan 15 '13 at 10:35
1  
Must add though that it is of course valid to access a variable like extern int a; from function scope as long as the variable is defined elsewhere in global scope. You don't need to put extern int a; in global scope in your file if you only need to access it from one function. – Jite Jan 15 '13 at 10:39
    
@Jite: (in answer to your first comment) technically I think the language in the standard is that the declaration results in a name with external linkage. That doesn't actually mean it's not defined in this file, you're allowed to follow up an extern declaration with a definition if you want to. And a good thing too, otherwise you couldn't include a library's "own" header file into the library source file prior to defining its globals :-) What external linkage does mean is that if two different TUs use identical names, both having external linkage, they refer to the same object/function. – Steve Jessop Jan 15 '13 at 10:51
    
@SteveJessop: Sure, thanks for clarifying. My first comment wasn't actually a statement but a question, so thanks for answering :) – Jite Jan 15 '13 at 21:56

6.9 External definitions of C99 states:

The storage-class specifiers auto and register shall not appear in the declaration specifiers in an external declaration.

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The OP's question paragraph is not very clear, but the title captures the essence; I believe this doesn't answer what he/she asked. – Albert Netymk Dec 29 '14 at 20:55
  1. Can local variables be declared extern?

No. But a global variable can be declared extern locally.

// file1.c
int Count;

// file2.c
void foo(void) {
  extern int Count;
  Count++;
}
  1. Can register variables be declared extern?

No. A variable may not be extern and register.

C11 dr 6.7.1 Storage-class specifiers
1 storage-class-specifier:
typedef
extern
static
_Thread_local
auto
register
Constraints
2 At most, one storage-class specifier may be given in the declaration specifiers in a declaration, except that _Thread_local may appear with static or extern)

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Can local variables be declared extern?

yes, in some cases.

Let's read the C99 N1256 standard draft.

The standard calls "local variables" as having "block scope".

6.7.1/5 Storage-class specifiers says:

The declaration of an identifier for a function that has block scope shall have no explicit storage-class specifier other than extern.

Then for what it means to add extern to a local variable, 6.2.2/4 Linkages of identifiers says:

For an identifier declared with the storage-class specifier extern in a scope in which a prior declaration of that identifier is visible, if the prior declaration specifies internal or external linkage, the linkage of the identifier at the later declaration is the same as the linkage specified at the prior declaration. If no prior declaration is visible, or if the prior declaration specifies no linkage, then the identifier has external linkage.

Lets break down those cases.

no prior declaration

In:

void f() {
    extern int i;
}

i has no prior declaration visible. So i has external linkage (the same linkage as global variables), and it would be the same as writing:

extern int i;
void f() {}

except that the declaration is only visible inside f.

prior declaration specifies no linkage

In:

void f() {
    int i;
    extern int i;
}

the prior declaration int i specifies no linkage because paragraph 6 says:

The following identifiers have no linkage: an identifier declared to be anything other than an object or a function; an identifier declared to be a function parameter; a block scope identifier for an object declared without the storage-class specifier extern.

so by 6.2.2/4 it is the same as above.

prior declaration specifies internal or external linkage

In:

extern int i;
void f() {
    extern int i;
}

and:

static int i;
void f() {
    extern int i;
}

we have a previous visible external and internal linkage declarations, so 6.2.2/4 says they are equivalent to:

extern int i;
void f() {}

and:

static int i;
void f() {}

Initialize local extern

One case where you cannot add extern is if the block scope declaration has an initialization:

void f() {
    extern int i = 0;
}

Doing so in file scope is fine though:

extern int i = 0;

and extern has no effect there.

6.7.8 Initialization says:

If the declaration of an identifier has block scope, and the identifier has external or internal linkage, the declaration shall have no initializer for the identifier.

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The phrase register variable is not clearly to me, so I would take one bold guess on what OP is really curious about, and rephrase the original question as: Could local variables be declared with extern specifier?, illustrated by the following snippet:

int main() {
    extern int x; // Is this OK?
    return 0;
}

The answer is yes.

scope (visibility) and storage are two independent and connected concept. Here, x is one local variable (scope), and it's only visible within this block. extern dictates the storage, meaning this is merely one declaration, this variable is defined somewhere else. Would recommend the C standard for definite reference.

As for the omitted register part, I assume OP meant one variable with register storage-class-specifier, like register int x. Then, it's illegal to specify register and extern at the same time.

int main() {
    extern auto int x; // This is wrong.
    return 0;
}

At most, one storage-class specifier may be given in the declaration specifiers in a declaration, except that _Thread_local may appear with static or extern.

The symmetric question would be: is it valid to specify auto or register with global or external variables, and this is exactly what Alexey Frunze's answer is about.

auto int x; // This is wrong.
int main() {
    return 0;
}
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