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Possible Duplicate:
How do you find out the caller function in JavaScript?

I have the following code:

JS:
function myfunc(mynumber){
   console.log(mynumber);
}

HTML:
<div onclick="myfunc(5);"></div>

Is there a way, with jQuery, to be able to get the context of that element that was clicked inside the myfunc function, without passing this or $(this) as a parameter in the onclick attribute?

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marked as duplicate by sp00m, adeneo, Anup Cowkur, Jon Egerton, jigfox Jan 15 '13 at 11:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Yes, remove the inline onclick function and use a proper $(element).on('click', function() {...}) instead, and all your problems are solved. –  adeneo Jan 15 '13 at 10:41
    
what are you passing in the function param? –  Jai Jan 15 '13 at 10:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd use jQuery to actually bind the event handler, that way this inside that function will refer to the element that triggered the event. You can use a HTML5 data-* attribute to store the number that you want to use for that particular element.

HTML

<div data-number="5">5</div>
<div data-number="26">26</div>

jQuery

$(function() {
    $('div').on('click', function(e) {
        console.log($(this).data('number'));
        console.log(this);
    });
});
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<script>
  $( "div").bind("click", function( e ) {
    myfunc(mynumber)
  });
</script>

or with param

$('div').bind("click", {  Param1: 2 }, function(event){
    alert(event.data.Param1);
});
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not sure if this is what you asked for. you can call a function with

myfunc.call(params);

now in myfunc, when you refer or use this, it refers to the context or DOM it was called from.

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