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I am trying to use an IComparer to sort a list of Points. Here is the IComparer class:

public class CoordinatesBasedComparer : IComparer
{
    public int Compare(Object q, Object r)
    {
        Point a = (p)q;
        Point b = (p)r;
        if ((a.x == b.x) && (a.y == b.y))
            return 0;
        if ((a.x < b.x) || ((a.x == b.x) && (a.y < b.y)))
            return -1;

        return 1;
    }
}

In the client code, I am trying to using this class for sorting a list of points p (of type List<Point>):

CoordinatesBasedComparer c = new CoordinatesBasedComparer();
Points.Sort(c);

The code errors out. Apparently it is expecting IComparer<Point> as arguemnt to sort method.
What do I need to do to fix this?

share|improve this question
    
What error are you getting? In what line? –  O. R. Mapper Jan 15 '13 at 11:09
1  
Why don't you use LINQ, it's even faster with sorting. –  gdoron Jan 15 '13 at 11:10
2  
@gdoron I'm not sure "faster" is the right term; more convenient, maybe –  Marc Gravell Jan 15 '13 at 11:16
    
@MarcGravell, I tested it several times, FASTER. Think of it, with LINQ you know when the List is sorted while with IComparer you don't. Faster. –  gdoron Jan 15 '13 at 11:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to implement the strongly type interface(MSDN).

public class CoordinatesBasedComparer : IComparer<Point>
{
    public int Compare(Point a, Point b)
    {
        if ((a.x == b.x) && (a.y == b.y))
            return 0;
        if ((a.x < b.x) || ((a.x == b.x) && (a.y < b.y)))
            return -1;

        return 1;
    }
}

BTW, I think you use too many braces, I believe they should be used only when they contribute to the compiler. This is my version:

if (a.x == b.x && a.y == b.y)
    return 0;
if (a.x < b.x || (a.x == b.x && a.y < b.y))
    return -1;

Just like I dislike people using return (0).


Note that if you target a .Net-3.5+ application you can use LINQ which is easier and even faster with sorting.

LINQ vesion can be something like:

var orderedList = Points.OrderBy(point => point.x)
                        .ThenBy(point => point.y)
                        .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
When you say IComparer<Point> , doesn't Point stand as a placeholder variable value for which value has to be specified during instatiation? A little confused...if the class around which it works need not be specified at the client side, whats the point in having generic type? –  Aadith Jan 15 '13 at 11:21
    
@Aadith, you got me confused... No, the interface: IComparer<T> left you to chose with what of class you want to replace T, in your case you used Point. Just like when you create a Generic list of points: List<Point> which is List<T> when T is Point. –  gdoron Jan 15 '13 at 11:24
    
Be aware that the LINQ version is different from the non-LINQ version in that the List<Point> instance is replaced. If it is important that the list remains the same list, this should be noted. –  O. R. Mapper Jan 15 '13 at 11:30
    
@O.R.Mapper. Just like with every LINQ method, with the fact that I never encountered a problem with it, I don't feel any need specifying it unless explicitly demanded to remain the original List<T>. –  gdoron Jan 15 '13 at 11:35
    
@gdoron got it..the point i was missing was that my class is actually a client to IComparer..thanks! –  Aadith Jan 15 '13 at 12:58
public class CoordinatesBasedComparer : IComparer, IComparer<Point>
{
    public int Compare(Point a, Point b)
    {
        if ((a.x == b.x) && (a.y == b.y))
            return 0;
        if ((a.x < b.x) || ((a.x == b.x) && (a.y < b.y)))
            return -1;

        return 1;
    }
    int IComparer.Compare(Object q, Object r)
    {
        return Compare((Point)q, (Point)r);            
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
What's the point of implementing IComparer (the non-generic version) here, if all OP needs is the generic version? –  zmbq Jan 15 '13 at 11:12
2  
@zmbq a: because when writing a comparer, you don't know who the caller is, and what they need. And b: because it is 1 line of actual code, plus a method signature –  Marc Gravell Jan 15 '13 at 11:14
    
+1, Only out of curiosity: Have you used IComparer, IComparer<Point> since LINQ entered the game?(in .Net3.5\C#3...) –  gdoron Jan 15 '13 at 11:28

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