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firstly I would like to say sorry if this is a repost, onto the question.

Im creating a function which checks certain objects inside a game loop and then returns a boolean value if the check comes back true or false, this is ran a total of 5 times inside my function. I was wondering if it is possible to return an array of all 5 of the boolean values from the function? below is an example of pseudo code which im trying to write:

   Bool funcName(obj obj[])
   {
       for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
       {
           boolVal[i]=ChckFunc(obj[i]);  
       }
       return  boolVal[];
   }

Thanks for any help

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Possible duplicate: /questions/4264304/howto-return-a-array-in-a-c-method –  Theocharis K. Jan 15 '13 at 11:42
    
@Aposperite: I'd say that possible duplicate isn't because it uses dynamically sized arrays where this is more to do with fix sized arrays. –  Scott Langham Jan 15 '13 at 11:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could return a std::array

std::array<bool, 5> funcName(obj obj[])
{
    std::array<bool, 5> boolArray;
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        boolArray[i]=ChckFunc(obj[i]);  
    }
    return  boolArray;
}

or use std::vector if you have a variable number of objects to check

std::vector<bool> funcName(obj obj[], int count)
{
    std::vector<bool> boolArray;
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        boolArray.push_back(ChckFunc(obj[i]));
    }
    return  boolArray;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks I will give that a try. –  Elliott Jan 15 '13 at 11:39
    
Its better to return a pointer instead of a copy. Its a waste of computation time. Refer to my answer for example code. –  theV0ID Jan 15 '13 at 11:43
    
You could return a pointer instead but I'd expect that the cost of the heap allocation for the vector would be higher than the cost of the copy construction (plus extra stack use) when we return it by value. If this level of optimisation is important to your program, it'd be worth profiling both versions. –  simonc Jan 15 '13 at 11:45
1  
@theVOID: I would have thought the example in this answer would be moved, not copied, and would be about as fast as the pointer version. This would also be safer regarding leaks as there's no requirement on the caller to have to remember to delete the returned data. –  Scott Langham Jan 15 '13 at 11:50
std::array<bool, 5> funcName( Obj const obj[] )
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In C++, you will need to know the length of the array. One method is to make it zero-terminated: (edit: this won't work for bools since its not possible to differ between false and 0)

bool* giveMeBools( unsigned int num )
{
   bool* result = new bool[ num + 1 ];
   for( unsigned int i = 0; i < num; ++i )
   {
     result[ i ] = myfunc( i );
   }
   result[ num ] = 0;
   return result;
}

But I would recommend you using std::vector instead of raw arrays in C++:

std::vector< bool >* giveMeBools( unsigned int num )
{
  std::vector< bool >* result = new std::vector< bool >();
   for( unsigned int i = 0; i < num; ++i )
   {
     result->push_back( myfunc( i ) );
   }
   return result;
}

Note that it is important that you use a pointer as return type. If you wouldn't, the whole array would get copied. This would be a waste of computation time.

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2  
In your C-style solution, how do you distinguish between array elements with value false and a 0 terminator? –  simonc Jan 15 '13 at 11:43
    
Right, this won't work. –  theV0ID Jan 15 '13 at 11:52

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