Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 3 entities (Orders, Items and OrderItems) with the following schema:

                    OrderItems
    Orders      +---------------+
+-----------+   | id (PK)       |     Items
| id (PK)   |==<| order_id (FK) |   +-------+
| createdAt |   | item_id (FK)  |>==| id    |
+-----------+   | createdAt     |   | name  |
                | quantity      |   +-------+
                +---------------+

I need to keep a history of OrderItems, so that if an OrderItem's quantity is changed we have a record of the original quantity for each successive change.

My problem is that I'd like to be able to select only the most recent items from the table for each order. For example:

First two (initial) OrderItems:
    (id: 1, order_id: 1, item_id: 1, createdAt: 2013-01-12, quantity: 10),
    (id: 2, order_id: 1, item_id: 2, createdAt: 2013-01-12, quantity: 10),

Later order items are amended to have different quantities, creating a new row:
    (id: 3, order_id: 1, item_id: 1, createdAt: 2013-01-14, quantity: 5),
    (id: 4, order_id: 1, item_id: 2, createdAt: 2013-01-14, quantity: 15),

My stab at the query to do this:

SELECT oi.* FROM OrderItems oi
WHERE oi.order_id = 1
GROUP BY oi.item_id
ORDER BY oi.createdAt DESC;

Which I'd hoped would produce this:

| id | order_id | item_id | createdAt  | quantity |
+----+----------+---------+------------+----------+
| 3  | 1        | 1       | 2013-01-14 | 5        |
| 4  | 2        | 2       | 2013-01-14 | 15       |

Actually produced this:

| id | order_id | item_id | createdAt  | quantity |
+----+----------+---------+------------+----------+
| 1  | 1        | 1       | 2013-01-12 | 10       |
| 2  | 2        | 2       | 2013-01-12 | 10       |

At the moment I think that just using the createdAt timestamp should be enough to identify the history of items, however I may move to linking to the previous item from each order item (linked list). If that makes it easier to make this query I'll move to that.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

SELECT 
  oi.*
FROM OrderItems oi
INNER JOIN
(
   SELECT item_id, MAX(createdAt) MaxDate
   FROM OrderItems
   WHERE order_id = 1
   GROUP BY item_id
) o2  ON oi.item_id = o2.item_id
     AND DATE(oi.CreatedAt) = DATE(o2.MaxDate)
ORDER BY oi.createdAt DESC;

SQL Fiddle Demo

This will give you:

| ID | ORDER_ID | ITEM_ID |  CREATEDAT | QUANTITY |
---------------------------------------------------
|  3 |        1 |       1 | 2013-01-14 |        5 |
|  4 |        1 |       2 | 2013-01-14 |       15 |
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Mahmoud, thanks this is really helpful. I modified slightly to use MAX(createdAt) (to give descending date order). Thanks again! –  Ross Jan 15 '13 at 12:08
1  
@Ross - Sorry for that. Just saw it. Fixed now. –  Mahmoud Gamal Jan 15 '13 at 12:10
    
@MahmoudGamal thanks for the fiddle :D –  bonCodigo Jan 15 '13 at 12:41

Here is another solution : definitely not opposing to Mahmoud :D (thanks for the sqlfiddle) If you want to try out.

Query:

SELECT * FROM orderitems
GROUP BY id
ORDER BY createdAt DESC
LIMIT 2
;

Results:

| ID | ORDER_ID | ITEM_ID |                      CREATEDAT | QUANTITY |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
|  3 |        1 |       1 | January, 14 2013 02:00:00+0000 |        5 |
|  4 |        1 |       2 | January, 14 2013 02:00:00+0000 |       15 |
share|improve this answer
    
@Ross I know you have accepted a great answer :) here is another way to do it. IF you are interested in to try out. –  bonCodigo Jan 15 '13 at 12:40
    
Thanks, this requires you to know how many order items exist first though. –  Ross Jan 16 '13 at 11:07
    
@Ross well that's not necessary, but if you have a date in Item_ID 1 that is later than item_id 2 then this will not work. Other than that it works. –  bonCodigo Jan 16 '13 at 11:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.