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I'm wrapping my head around this problem. I think it's actually not possible to do, but just to be sure I'd like to ask here if there actually is a solution. Consider the following code. There are 2 templated classes A and B and two non-templated classes C and D which derive from A and B respectively.

// definition of class A
template <class DerivedA, class DerivedB> class A {
private:
    DerivedB data;
public:
    A(const DerivedB& data) : data(data) {}
    virtual ~A() {}
    DerivedB get() const { return data; }
};

// definition of class B
template <class DerivedA, class DerivedB> class B {
private:
    DerivedA data;
public:
    B(const DerivedA& data) : data(data) {}
    virtual ~B() {}
    DerivedA get() const { return data; }
};

// forward declaration of D
class D;

// definition of class C, derives from A<C, D>
class C : public A<C, D> {
private:
    int extraInfo;
public:
    C(const D& d) : A(d) {}
    virtual ~C() {}
    int getExtraInfo() const { return extraInfo; }
};

// definition of class D, derives from B<C, D>
class D : public B<C, D> {
private:
    int extraInfo;
public:
    D(const C& c) : B(c) {}
    virtual ~D() {}
    int getExtraInfo() const { return extraInfo; }
};

The problem here is that class C cannot be defined because class D is only forward declared. Hence, when the template A is written out then it doesn't know what its type for its private member is. Note that I cannot work with pointers, I need some known functionality. Is it in any way possible to compile such that I have my classes C and D?

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What exactly prevents you from using pointers? –  Henrik Jan 15 '13 at 12:07
    
What are you trying to achieve ? –  Yochai Timmer Jan 15 '13 at 12:23
    
@YochaiTimmer I'm trying to implement a directed graph. class A represents a node and class B represents an arc. To actually use the directed graph with useful properties on the nodes and edges one should derive from the node class and the edge class. To circumvent dynamic_cast I try to use this templated approach. –  rwols Jan 15 '13 at 12:26
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no way around this problem as you explain it and there should not be. As you have it now:

class C : public A<C, D>

means that C will inherit a data member of type D. In turn:

class D : public B<C, D>

means that D will inherit a data member of type C.

If C has a D, which has a C, which has a D... you have a nice infinite recursion, meaning in this case that the size of any C or D object will be infinite.

So, unless you use pointers (you can cut the infinite chain at any point inserting an appropriate null pointer) or references (you can reference a previously used object), you cannot and should not have this kind of classes.

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C inherits a member of type D, D inherits a member of type C. So, no, it's not possible.

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You can get away with this by making C and D implement a pure-virtual class, with the functionality you need (including getters), and making them pass that class as a template argument. You then do actually use a pointer to it in A and B, but you keep all the functionality.

Something like this (make your own adaptations)

// definition of class A
template <class DerivedA, class DerivedB> class A {
private:
    const DerivedB& _data;
public:
    A(const DerivedB& data) : _data(data) {}
    virtual ~A() {}
    DerivedB& get() const { return data; }
};

// definition of class B
template <class DerivedA, class DerivedB> class B {
private:
    DerivedA data;
public:
    B(const DerivedA& data) : data(data) {}
    virtual ~B() {}
    DerivedA get() const { return data; }
};

class TheInterface {
public:
    virtual int getExtraInfo() const = 0;
virtual ~TheInterface() = 0;
};

// definition of class C, derives from A<C, D>
class C : public TheInterface, public A<C, TheInterface> {
private:
    int extraInfo;
public:
    C(const TheInterface& d) : A(d) {}
    virtual ~C() {}
    int getExtraInfo() const { return extraInfo; }
};

// definition of class D, derives from B<C, D>
class D : public TheInterface, public B<C, D> {
private:
    int extraInfo;
public:
    D(const C& c) : B(c) {}
    virtual ~D() {}
    int getExtraInfo() const { return extraInfo; }
};
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