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/**
 * Example Activity to demonstrate the lifecycle callback methods.
 */
public class ActivityA extends Activity {

    private String mActivityName;
    private TextView mStatusView;
    private TextView mStatusAllView;
    private StatusTracker mStatusTracker = StatusTracker.getInstance();
    private AlertDialog alertBox;
    private static int number = 0;

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_a);

        init();

        String output = getString(R.string.on_create) + number++;
        showAlertDialog(alertBox, output);
        mStatusTracker.setStatus(mActivityName, output);
        Utils.printStatus(mStatusView, mStatusAllView);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onStart() {
        super.onStart();
        mStatusTracker.setStatus(mActivityName, getString(R.string.on_start));
        Utils.printStatus(mStatusView, mStatusAllView);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onRestart() {
        super.onRestart();
        mStatusTracker.setStatus(mActivityName, getString(R.string.on_restart));
        Utils.printStatus(mStatusView, mStatusAllView);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onResume() {
        super.onResume();
        mStatusTracker.setStatus(mActivityName, getString(R.string.on_resume));
        Utils.printStatus(mStatusView, mStatusAllView);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPause() {
        super.onPause();
        mStatusTracker.setStatus(mActivityName, getString(R.string.on_pause));
        Utils.printStatus(mStatusView, mStatusAllView);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onStop() {
        super.onStop();
        mStatusTracker.setStatus(mActivityName, getString(R.string.on_stop));
    }

    @Override
    protected void onDestroy() {
        super.onDestroy();
        mStatusTracker.setStatus(mActivityName, getString(R.string.on_destroy));
        mStatusTracker.clear();
    }

    public void startDialog(View v) {
        Intent intent = new Intent(ActivityA.this, DialogActivity.class);
        startActivity(intent);
    }

    public void startActivityB(View v) {
        Intent intent = new Intent(ActivityA.this, ActivityB.class);
        startActivity(intent);
    }

    public void startActivityC(View v) {
        Intent intent = new Intent(ActivityA.this, ActivityC.class);
        startActivity(intent);
    }

    public void finishActivityA(View v) {
        ActivityA.this.finish();
    }

    private void showAlertDialog(AlertDialog ad, String msg) {
        ad.setTitle("Logging Msg");
        ad.setMessage(msg);
        ad.show();
    }

    private void init() {
        System.out.println("Value = before &&&&&&&&& " + alertBox);
        if (alertBox == null) { // Why always null?
            alertBox = new AlertDialog.Builder(this).create();
            mActivityName = getString(R.string.activity_a);
            mStatusView = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.status_view_a);
            mStatusAllView = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.status_view_all_a);
            Log.e("ActivityA", "Init done **************************************");
            Log.e("ActivityA", "Init done **************************************");
            System.out.println("Value = after &&&&&&&&&&& " + alertBox);
        }
    }
}

Only the very first time the init is called, I set alertBox and I thought the if block should not be executed any other time. But I am wrong, it runs every time init is being called. Why??

I came from Javascript, if I translate the above code into JS (similar), the if block is only evaluated once...

Any idea? Many thanks

share|improve this question
2  
Keep it short and simple. –  Karna Jan 15 '13 at 12:26
2  
If you think Java and Javascript are related, you have much bigger problems. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 15 '13 at 12:27
1  
Java to Javascript is same as Car to Carpet. –  Karna Jan 15 '13 at 12:27
    
I suggest you go learn Java from the start. Java and JavaScript are 2 completely different languages. –  m0skit0 Jan 15 '13 at 12:30
    
Check in the debugger if the instance of 'ActivityA' is the same each time. I would suspect that you have a new instance every time init is called ... then alertBox is null every time. –  Arne Jan 15 '13 at 12:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should check how your application follows the android activity lifecycle. The onCreate method gets called every time an Activity is created again (even if it existed before). Check if your onDestroy() method gets called. If the answer is yes, you now know how android handles its Activitys. See http://developer.android.com/training/basics/activity-lifecycle/starting.html for an in detail explanation.

However if the answer is no, there is something wrong on your activity handling. Maybe you recreate the same activity every time the user pushes a button etc. Maybe you finish() the activity somewhere. But this is just wild guessing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ins0m. I thought there is only one instance of Activity and onCreate is being called multiple times. –  David He Jan 15 '13 at 22:35

alertBox is declared as an instance variable.

Maybe you should make alertBox a static variable if you only want to set it once for the class and not for every object instance.

share|improve this answer
    
Making it static is not a good idea, because alertBox holds a reference to the activity where it was created. –  Pablo Jan 15 '13 at 12:46

alertBox is a member variable of a the class, ie each instance of the class has its own copy. So if you have multiple instances of ActivityA each has its own alertBox all set to null initially.

If you want to share alertBox you need to declare it as static:

private static AlertDialog alertBox;

Although, this might result in (additional) problems in a multi-threaded application, so use with care!

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the multithreading advice :) –  m0skit0 Jan 15 '13 at 12:30
    
Making it static is not a good idea, because alertBox holds a reference to the activity where it was created. –  Pablo Jan 15 '13 at 12:46
    
@Pablo the static AlertDialog.Builder() method is using the reference. Maybe to only grab some theming information..? So it is certainly not said that AlertBox itself has the reference! –  Veger Jan 15 '13 at 12:51
    
AlertDialogBuilder calls the constructor of AlertDialog, that one calls the constructor of the parent class (Dialog). You can see the source here, and the Context is saved in a instance variable. –  Pablo Jan 15 '13 at 12:55
    
When checking out your linked source, one can see that context ends up in a ContextThemeWrapper, so I still suspect that context is only used for theming. But this is getting out-of-scope, as the question was why alertBox was null each time init() got called. –  Veger Jan 15 '13 at 12:58

Probably, the activity is destroyed and recreated, so the new object has alertBox as null.

You should not change it to an static variable, because alertBox holds a reference to the activity where it was created (I'm not sure if it would even work correctly in other instances of the activity), so if you saved it in a static variable, it would prevent the original activity from being collected by the GC (garbage collector).

Creating a new one in each instance of the activity is the right way to go (the way you are doing it now is fine).

share|improve this answer
    
I do not see where AlertBox itself does get hold of the reference (and keeps it). –  Veger Jan 15 '13 at 12:52

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