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I have the following class:

class MyTimer
{
    class MyTimerInvalidType : SystemException
    {
    }
    class MyTimerNegativeCycles : SystemException
    {
    }

    private Timer timer = new Timer(1000);
    private int cycles = 0;

    public int Cycle
    {
        get
        {
            return this.cycles;
        }

        set
        {
            if(value >= 0)
                this.cycles = value;
            else
                throw new MyTimerNegativeCycles();
        }
    }

    private void timer_Tick(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            this.Cycle--;
        }
        catch
        {
            this.Cycle = 0;
            timer.Stop();
        }
    }

    public MyTimer()
    {
        this.Cycle = 20;

        timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Tick);
        timer.Start();
    }
}

In my MainWindow class I have a List I add a MyTimer to when a button is pressed:

private List<MyTimer> timers = new List<MyTimer>();

private void testbtn_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    timers.Add(new MyTimer());
}

I tried to pass a label to the MyTimer class as a ref and update it but that won't work (can't access UI elements from another thread).

What is a good way to show the MyTimer.Cycle in a label so that it updates everytime the value is changed?

I must be able to "bind" each MyTimer to a different label from the code (or not bind it to a label at all).

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What do you mean with "passing a label to the MyTimer class"? –  Nico Schertler Jan 15 '13 at 13:20
    
@nico-schertler I made a method to MyTimer that takes a label ref as a parameter and then tried passing a ref to a label through it. –  Kyto Jan 15 '13 at 13:28
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should use the BeginInvoke or Invoke method of the Dispatcher property of your label to change anything on your label or call any of it's methods:

private void timer_Tick(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        this.Cycle--;
        this.label.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(
            () => { label.Text = this.Cycle.ToString(); } ));
    }
    catch
    {
        this.Cycle = 0;
        timer.Stop();
    }
}

See Remarks section of the Dispatcher class or Dispatcher property.

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The easiest solution to your problem is to use DispatchTimers. Dispatch timers use the windows message queue instead of a thread to dispatch timer tick events. This will make it so you don't have cross threading issues. Just keep in mind you are no longer working on a different thread and could lockup the UI if you do anything computationally expensive. Also due to the nature of dispatching on the message queue the timing is less accurate.

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In WPF, you'd have a ViewModel (C#) associated with your View (XAML).
Read up on this if you're not familiar with MVVM.

Then the ViewModel would expose a property (let's call it Cycle) on which the View would bind:

<Label Content="{Binding Cycle}" />

Then if the value in the ViewModel has to be updated from another thread, do it like this:

Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() => 
{
    //Update here
}));

That will execute the update logic on the UI thread.

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If you're new to WPF I'd strongly suggest that read a bit about DataBinding and Data Templating.

To start, the simplest way do display windows data in older UI models (like Windows Forms) has always been to have code in the code-behind set some property of the UI. This has changed drastically with WPF and the goal now is to have the UI look at business objects (like your MyTimer) and set the UI accordingly.

First we need to expose your business objects to the xaml of your application.

Me.DataContext = new MyTimer();

This sets the data context for the Window/UserControl to be the a new MyTimer(); Because the DataContext property is automatically based from a parent UI element to a child UI elelement (unless the child defines it's own DataContext), every element in your Window/UserControl will now have a DataContext of this object.

Next we can create a binding to a property of this object. By default all bindings are relative to the DataContext of the control from which it's located.

<Label Content="{Binding Cycle}" />

So in the previous example the binding was on the content property of the label. So in this case it will automatically set the Content to the value of the "Cycle" property from the DataContext (MyTimer)!

There is however one catch. If you run this sample as is WPF will take the value when the form loads but it won't update the label ever again! The key here to updating the UI is to implement the INotifyPropertyChanged interface.

This interface simply tells any listeners whenever a property (such as your Cycles) changes. The great thing is that Bindings automatically support this interface and will automatically propagate changes when your source implements INotifyPropertyChanged.

public class MyTimer : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private int cycles;

    public int Cycles
    {
        get
        {
            return cycles;
        }
        set
        {
            if (cycles < 0)
            {
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("value", "Cycles cannot be set to a number smaller than 0.");
            }
            else if(value <> cycles)
            {
                cycles = value;

                if (PropertyChanged != null)
                {
                    PropertyChanged(Me, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Cycles"))
                }
            }
        }
    }

    //insert your constructor(s) and timer code here.
}

And voila! Your timer will now update the UI with it's cycles property.

You however also noted that you were storing your MyTimer objects in a list. If you were to instead put them inside an ObservableCollection (the default implementation of INotifyCollectionChanged - the collection variant of INotifyPropertyChanged) you can do other neat tricks:

In your Window/UserControl constructor:

ObservableCollection<MyTimer> timers = New ObservableCollection<MyTimer>();
timers.Add(New MyTimer());
DataContext = timers;

Then you can display them all at once in your xaml:

<ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding}">
    <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate>
            <Label>
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding StringFormat='Cycles Remaining: {0}'}" />
            </Label>
        </DataTemplate>
    </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
</ItemsControl>
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