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IEnumerable<T> exposes an enumerator, so the object can be enumerated. There is nothing about indexes exposed by this interface. IList<T> is about indexes, as it exposes the IndexOf method.

So what's the point of Enumerable.ElementAt? I just read the doc of this LINQ extension method:

Returns the element at a specified index in a sequence.

Well, yes, it's about a sequence, not just an IEnumerable. Reading the remarks:

If the type of source implements IList, that implementation is used to obtain the element at the specified index. Otherwise, this method obtains the specified element.

Okay, so if the concrete type implements something that inherits from IList<T> (which is an actual sequence), then it's the same as IndexOf(). If not, it iterates until the index is reached.

Here's a sample scenario:

// Some extension method exposed by a lib
// I know it's not a good piece of code, but let's say it's coded this way:
public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    // Returns true if all elements are ordered
    public static bool IsEnumerableOrdered(this IEnumerable<int> value)
    {
        // Iterates over elements using an index
        for (int i = 0; i < value.Count() - 1; i++)
        {
            if (value.ElementAt(i) > value.ElementAt(i + 1))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }
}

// Here's a collection that is enumerable, but doesn't always returns
// its objects in the same order
public class RandomAccessEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    private List<T> innerList;
    private static Random rnd = new Random();

    public RandomAccessEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> list)
    {
        innerList = list.ToList();
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        var listCount = this.innerList.Count;
        List<int> enumeratedIndexes = new List<int>();

        for (int i = 0; i < listCount; i++)
        {
            int randomIndex = -1;
            while (randomIndex < 0 || enumeratedIndexes.Contains(randomIndex))
            {
                randomIndex = rnd.Next(listCount);
            }

            enumeratedIndexes.Add(randomIndex);
            yield return this.innerList[randomIndex];
        }
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

// Here's some test program
internal class Program
{
    private static void Main()
    {
        var test0 = new List<int> { 0, 1, 2, 3 };
        var test1 = new RandomAccessEnumerable<int>(test0);

        Console.WriteLine("With List");
        Console.WriteLine(test0.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // true
        Console.WriteLine(test0.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // true
        Console.WriteLine(test0.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // true
        Console.WriteLine(test0.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // true
        Console.WriteLine(test0.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // true

        Console.WriteLine("With RandomAccessEnumerable");
        Console.WriteLine(test1.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // might be true or false
        Console.WriteLine(test1.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // might be true or false
        Console.WriteLine(test1.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // might be true or false
        Console.WriteLine(test1.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // might be true or false
        Console.WriteLine(test1.IsEnumerableOrdered()); // might be true or false

        Console.Read();
    }
}

So, as RandomAccessEnumerable might return enumerated objects in a random order, you just can't rely on the simple IEnumerable<T> interface to assume your elements are indexed. So you don't want to use ElementAt for an IEnumerable.

In the above example, I think IsEnumerableOrdered should require a IList<T> parameter as it implies elements are a sequence. I actually can't find a scenario where the ElementAt method is useful, and not bug-prone.

share|improve this question
2  
It would probably make more sense for IOrderedEnumerable<T> types. –  jrummell Jan 15 '13 at 13:26
3  
it's about a sequence, not just an IEnumerable: and how exactly do you define a "sequence"? For me the IEnumerable interface represents a sequence of elements, no more, no less... Most of the time the elements in an IEnumerable will be returned in the same order; your RandomAccessEnumerable example is too contrived to be really relevant. –  Thomas Levesque Jan 15 '13 at 13:27
2  
Well, LinkedList is a sequence but it doesn't implement IList :( –  2kay Jan 15 '13 at 13:30
6  
Just because you've come up with a poorly-coded use of ElementAt, and an IEnumerable that gives non-deterministic results for many Enumerable methods, doesn't mean ElementAt is useless or bug-prone. –  Rawling Jan 15 '13 at 13:30
2  
@ken2k - when you write a lib, and just get handed an IEnumerable, there are all kinds of things that you don't know. Is it safe to enumerate it more than once? That's why you document your expectations for your library methods and expect people using your library to meet them. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 15 '13 at 13:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are many IEnumerable types like array or list. All IList types(which Array also implements) have an indexer which you can use to access elements at a specific index.

This will be used by Enumerable.ElementAt if the seuqnce can be casted to IList successfully. Otherwise the sequence will be enumerated.

So it's just a convenient way to access elements at a given index for all kind of IEnumerable types.

This has the advantage that you can change the type later without needing to change all occurences of arr[index].

For what it's worth, here's the reflected(ILSpy) method to demonstrate what i've said:

public static TSource ElementAt<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int index)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    IList<TSource> list = source as IList<TSource>;
    if (list != null)
    {
        return list[index];
    }
    if (index < 0)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentOutOfRange("index");
    }
    TSource current;
    using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            if (index == 0)
            {
                current = enumerator.Current;
                return current;
            }
            index--;
        }
        throw Error.ArgumentOutOfRange("index");
    }
    return current;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well I do understand the way ElementAt works, I was just wondering why someone would use it for non-IList objects, as we can't assume an IEnumerable object always returns its items in the same order. –  ken2k Jan 15 '13 at 14:17
    
1. because he might use a query today and a IList tomorrow. For example: items.Where(i=>i%2==0).Take(10).OrderBy(i=>i).ElementAt(5) You don't need to modify the implementation if you want another collection, just prepend ToList or ToArray and it still works. –  Tim Schmelter Jan 15 '13 at 14:20
    
I see your (valid) point. What I still don't get is why someone would use items.Where(i=>i%2==0).Take(10).OrderBy(i=>i).ElementAt(5) in the first place with items as an IEnumerable, knowing that IEnumerable is not ordered per definition (so there is no index). –  ken2k Jan 15 '13 at 14:32
    
I guess I'm just over-thinking about that, maybe it's just like Skip() or Take() as others said. –  ken2k Jan 15 '13 at 14:35
    
@ken2k: The query above is ordered. Not every IEnumerable is unordered (f.e. a Dictionary is unordered and an IEnumerable). –  Tim Schmelter Jan 15 '13 at 14:41

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