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I want to make some numerical computations in java, and to make operation really modular, I want pass functions as parameters of other functions. I was searching and normally it is done in java using class which warp the function. I realy don't need instantiate these classes (there are no data inside) and I want to make it as fast as possible (somewhere was writen that final static methods are inlined by JIT compiler). So I made something like this

public static class Function2 {
  public static float eval(float a, float b){ return Float.NaN; }  
}

public static class FAdd extends Function2 {
  public static float eval(float a, float b){ return a+b; }  
}

public static class Fmult extends Function2 {
  public static float eval(float a, float b){ return a*b; }  
}

void arrayOp( float [] a, float [] b, float [] out, Function2 func ){
  for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++){     out[i] = func.eval( a[i], b[i] );   }
}

float [] a,b, out;

void setup(){
  println( FAdd.eval(10,20) );
  arrayOp( a,b, out, FAdd );
}

However it prints error: "Cannot find anything like FAdd" when I try to pass it to arrayOp, even though println( FAdd.eval(10,20) ) works fine. So it seem that for some reason it is just impossible to pass static class as a prameter.

What you recommand to solve such task? I actualy want FAdd to be something like macro, nad arrayOp be polymorf (behave depending of which macro I pass in). But ideal would be if it would be resolved in compile time (not in runtime) to improve numerical speed. The compiled result should be the same as if I would write

void arrayAdd( float [] a, float [] b, float [] out ){
  for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++){     out[i] = a[i]  + b[i];    }
}
void arrayMult( float [] a, float [] b, float [] out ){
  for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++){     out[i] = a[i] * b[i];   }
} 
share|improve this question
    
Functions aren't first-class objects in Java, so this isn't possible with Java <=7. Not sure about Java 8. Instead, Python or Ruby allow you to do this. –  Makoto Jan 15 '13 at 13:40
    
The result will be the same but it won't be anywhere need as fast. If performance is critical you should provide individual methods like you have at the end. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 15 '13 at 13:52
1  
@Makoto Methods will be first class objects in Java 8 but it hasn't been released yet. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 15 '13 at 13:52

6 Answers 6

Have you considered using enums?

private void test() {
  test(3.0f, 4.0f, F.Add);
  test(3.0f, 4.0f, F.Sub);
  test(3.0f, 4.0f, F.Mul);
  test(3.0f, 4.0f, F.Div);
  float[] a = {1f, 2f, 3f, 4f, 5f};
  float[] b = {4f, 9f, 16f, 25f, 36f};
  test(a, b, F.Add);
  test(a, b, F.Sub);
  test(a, b, F.Mul);
  test(a, b, F.Div);
}

private void test(float[] a, float[] b, F f) {
  System.out.println(Arrays.toString(a) + " " + f + " " + Arrays.toString(b) + " = " + Arrays.toString(f.f(a, b, f)));
}

private void test(float a, float b, F f) {
  System.out.println(a + " " + f + " " + b + " = " + f.f(a, b));
}

public enum F {
  Add {
    @Override
    public float f(float x, float y) {
      return x + y;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "+";
    }
  },
  Sub {
    @Override
    public float f(float x, float y) {
      return x - y;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "-";
    }
  },
  Mul {
    @Override
    public float f(float x, float y) {
      return x * y;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "*";
    }
  },
  Div {
    @Override
    public float f(float x, float y) {
      return x / y;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "/";
    }
  };

  // Evaluate to a new array.
  static float[] f(float[] x, float[] y, F f) {
    float[] c = new float[x.length];
    for (int i = 0; i < x.length; i++) {
      c[i] = f.f(x[i], y[i]);
    }
    return c;
  }

  // All must have an f(x,y) method.
  public abstract float f(float x, float y);

  // Also offer a toString - defaults to the enum name.  
  @Override
  public String toString() {
    return this.name();
  }
}

Prints:

3.0 + 4.0 = 7.0
3.0 - 4.0 = -1.0
3.0 * 4.0 = 12.0
3.0 / 4.0 = 0.75
[1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0] + [4.0, 9.0, 16.0, 25.0, 36.0] = [5.0, 11.0, 19.0, 29.0, 41.0]
[1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0] - [4.0, 9.0, 16.0, 25.0, 36.0] = [-3.0, -7.0, -13.0, -21.0, -31.0]
[1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0] * [4.0, 9.0, 16.0, 25.0, 36.0] = [4.0, 18.0, 48.0, 100.0, 180.0]
[1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0] / [4.0, 9.0, 16.0, 25.0, 36.0] = [0.25, 0.22222222, 0.1875, 0.16, 0.1388889]
share|improve this answer
    
This is a really nice technique, +1 for the solution. –  Waqas Ilyas Jan 15 '13 at 13:54
    
Recognize, however, that this is no different than defining a separate class and instance for each operation. It's simply less typing. –  parsifal Jan 15 '13 at 15:02
    
@parsifal - not just less typing but it also adheres to all sorts of coding principles such as Least Astonishment etc. Besides - each class is only ever instantiated once. –  OldCurmudgeon Jan 15 '13 at 15:50
1  
@OldCurmudgeon - Note that I didn't say this was a bad practice. However, in my experience, the idea that enums have any behavior astonishes lots of people. And creating anonymous subclasses of an enum is likely to astonish even more. –  parsifal Jan 15 '13 at 16:00
    
wow, Interesting to learn that enums has some no-trivial functionality. However, I would prefer class over enum, because class could be extended (inheriated, overriden) later by user if he wants define his own functional core for arrayOp. Also I'm mostly working in Processing (processing.org) and it seems that enums are still not working there. –  Prokop Hapala Jan 15 '13 at 19:34

What you want to achieve is actually the functionality of anonymous function or lambda expression, which is in the JSR 335 (Lambda Expressions for the Java Programming Language) and will be available in Java 8. Currently, only anonymous inner class is close to that. This question( What's the nearest substitute for a function pointer in Java? ) in stackoverflow may help you.

share|improve this answer

You're making some massive assumptions that the fastest code will be only if its a final static method. You are most likely wrong, and should be focusing on architecting it properly and testing for performance.

One method is using enemy's, as stated above. I'd say what yo should do is have an interface with the eval function. You can then pass in an implementation of the interface.

The Java VM will realize optimize that code appropriately.

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Static methods can not be overridden, but you can do it with an anonymous class:

public static class Function2 {
    public float eval(float a, float b){ return Float.NaN; }  
}

arrayOp(a, b, out, new Function2() {
    public float eval(float a, float b){
        return FAdd.eval(a, b);
    }});

Note that the method declaration in of eval() in Function2 is not static.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't like "new" here, which would allocate new object. (I'm not sure if it is somehow optimized in JIT, that new objects with no data inside is can be inlined in compile time?) –  Prokop Hapala Jan 15 '13 at 14:39

You are actually mixing up instances and classes in your implementation. When you have a method declared like this:

void arrayOp( float [] a, float [] b, float [] out, Function2 func ){
   for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++){     out[i] = func.eval( a[i], b[i] );   }
}

You are basically saying that you expect an instance of class Function2, and not really a class parameter. Also this statement is syntactically incorrect:

arrayOp( a,b, out, FAdd );

So lets say you want to send the class itself to a method, then your declaration of arrayOp will look something like:

void arrayOp( float [] a, float [] b, float [] out, Class func ){

And when you call this method you will pass in the parameter in this way:

arrayOp( a,b, out, FAdd.class );

But static methods cannot be overridden via inheritance. You need a completely different implementation for achieving your goals. That said @OldCurmudgeon has presented a really nice solution to your problem. Consider using that.

share|improve this answer

I made some tests, and it seems that really, there is no need to try optimize it on modern machines.

Machine 1 - (my older home computer) 32bit WinXP, Intel Pentium 3, (I'm not sure about java version) For both operations float.mult and float.add the static version is more than 2x faster

static  100000000 [ops]  406.0 [s]  4.06 [ns/op] 
dynamic 100000000 [ops]  1188.0 [s]  11.88 [ns/op] 

but for float Sqrt the difference is already very small

static  100000000 [ops]  922.0 [s]  9.22 [ns/op] 
dynamic 100000000 [ops]  1172.0 [s]  11.719999 [ns/op] 

Machine 2 - (my computer at work) - 64bit ubuntu 12.04LTS, Intel Core5, java version "1.6.0_12-ea, Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_12-ea-b02), Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 11.2-b01, mixed mode) The results are much better (for float.add):

static  1000000000 [ops]  1747.0 [s]  1.7470001 [ns/op] 
dynamic 1000000000 [ops]  1750.0 [s]  1.75 [ns/op] 

So - I think processor or JIT is already clever enought that ther is no need to optimize this function passing anyhow.

NOTE: - static mean solution without passing function ( I just inline operations manually into the loop), - dynamic mean solution when I use passing function as dynamic object instance (not static class). It seem that JIT understand that there are no dynamic data inside the class and so it resolve it in compile time anyway.

so my dynamic solution is just simple :

public class Function2 {
  public float eval(float a, float b){ return Float.NaN; }  
}

public class FAdd extends Function2 {
  public float eval(float a, float b){ return a+b; }
}

public class FMult extends Function2 {
  public float eval(float a, float b){ return a*b; }  
}

public void arrayOp( float [] a, float [] b, float [] out, Function2 func ){
  for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++){     out[i] = func.eval( a[i], b[i] );   }
}

final int m = 100;
final int n = 10000000;
float t1,t2;
float [] a,b, out;
a = new float[n];   b = new float[n];   out = new float[n];
t1 = millis();
Function2 func = new FMult(); 
for (int i=0;i<m;i++) arrayOp( a,b, out, func );
t2 = millis();
println( " dynamic " +(n*m)+" [ops]  "+(t2-t1)+" [s]  "+ 1000000*((t2-t1)/(n*m))+" [ns/op] " );
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