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I was trying to make a Request-response sequence of messages between client and server. For parsing the messages I was using flex and bison grammar. I have a question regarding reusing of a rule in different grammar. for example if I have a grammar for processing request as

req_message:
    request_message
    |response_message
    |error
    ; 

where request message is

request_message:
    |request_header_list request_hdr

and request_hdr is

request_hdr:
    accept
    |accept_language
    |bandwidth
    |user_agent
    |session
    |cseq
    |cache_control
    ..
    ;

similarly for response I have a grammer as

response_header:
    cseq
    |session
    |range
    |public
    |server
    |content_type
    ..
    ;

For parsing the cseq, I have defined only one rule. That rule is working fine while parsing the request. But while parsing the response, the rule is not showing up. Is there anything like, same rule cannot be used for different grammars ? Why is it working for request and not working for response ? In the lex side, I found no problem in parsing the lexims, it is able to return cseq token to the yacc

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1 Answer

It's a little difficult to diagnose the problem without seeing a little more of your yacc spec. In particular, it would be helpful to see your production (grammar rule) for response_message. However, even without that information, I notice that your naming is inconsistent. You have request_hdr but response_header. Is that intentional?

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response_header is part of response message sending... I have not defined it in the question. the request header and response header contain different fields thats why I included both. –  jithin Jan 15 '13 at 15:05
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