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Suppose, that there's a piece of code:

enum Directions
{
    North,
    South,
    East,
    West
}

// (...)

switch (dir)
{
    case North : // Do sth
    case South : // Do sth
    case East : // Do sth
    case West : // Do sth
}

Notice especially the lack of default: directive. Now suppose, that later someone added four more values to that enum: NorthEast, NorthWest, SouthEast, SouthWest. In such case it is likely, that the quoted code will effect in undefined behavior, because there is no security measure to handle possible extensions to Directions enumeration type.

I've got some questions regarding this matter.

  1. Shall a programmer implement a security measure here, eg:

    default: throw new InvalidArgumentException("Unsupported enum value!");
    
  2. Should this matter be tested in unit testing?

    // Naïve implementation, for example purposes only
    [ExpectedException(typeof(InvalidArgumentException))]
    [Test]
    void SomeTestMethod()
    {
        SomeFunction((Direction)-1);
    }
    

    If so, how would you automate such kind of test (eg. find ordinal value different from all other values in this enum, take into consideration enum backing type etc.)?

  3. Should this matter be verified during static code analysis? Which tool can provide such informations? I've written simple Proof-of-concept in VS 2012 Pro, run code analysis, but IDE reported, that 'No code analysis issues were detected'.

    The code:

    namespace ManagedConsoleSketchbook
    {
        class Program
        {
            enum MyEnum
            {
                One,
                Two,
                Three
            }
    
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                MyEnum e = MyEnum.One;
    
                switch (e)
                {
                    case MyEnum.One:
                        break;
                    case MyEnum.Two:
                        break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    
  4. Is there a generic approach to this general problem? Eg. maybe I can write sophisticated test method in C# using reflection, but in C++ it's a lot harder to nail down such potential code integrity breach than in C# or other higher-level languages.


Why do I ask about if it should be checked during unit testing? It's because - as far as I know - unit tests shall verify, if method behaves as it is supposed (documented) to. In this case it is supposed to accept any of four enum elements and it actually do it, so all tests should pass. Checking for potential problems seems to me not to be a concern of the unit testing process. If I'd like to verify all possibilities of potential problems in unit tests, I'd probably end up with writing a hundreds of tests for 3-line-of-code methods.

On the other hand it seems like a quite cheap (in terms of spent resources) way of making sure, that the method won't cause any serious problems, when someone decides to add another value to an enum.

share|improve this question
    
If you add new directions, isn't it likely that you test those, and because you forgot to implement them in the switch/case your code simply does not work? You could simplify the debugging proces by throwing an exception. –  2pietjuh2 Jan 15 '13 at 14:21
    
when you say "undefined behavior", this is untrue as far as I can see. The behaviour is well-defined (although possibly unwanted). What do you mean when you say this? Just that you'll fall through the switch without doing anything? –  PeteH Jan 15 '13 at 14:38
    
Imagine, that in C++ someone indexes a statically allocated array with an enum and then just adds an element to that enum. And now try to imagine, how much damage this change can do. In C# the problem may not be as serious as in C++, but still may cause some serious trouble. Heck, this enum can always be casted to int and P/Invoked to a native DLL. Use your imagination, man :) In this particular case it won't do much harm, but production code rarely looks like this :) –  Spook Jan 15 '13 at 17:14
    
@2pietjuh2 Yes, I know that and actually I try to do so every time I do switch through all elements of an enum. But either I or anyone else may simply forget about doing so and I'm searching for an automated way of making sure, that this won't happen (or at least will be detected quickly). Actually, I'm kinda hoping of answers, which will help me in resolving any similar [potential] problems. –  Spook Jan 15 '13 at 17:19
    
Care to comment on a close vote? –  Spook Jan 15 '13 at 17:21
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1: Yes, I do this routinely.

2: Yes. I would add this:

[ExpectedException(typeof(InvalidArgumentException))]
[Test]
void SomeTestMethod()
{
    Direction testValue = (Direction)-1;
    Assert.IsFalse(Enum.IsDefined(typeof(Direction), testValue));
    SomeFunction((Direction)-1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Assert.IsFalse(Enum.IsDefined(typeof(Direction), testValue)); - this is actually quite a bright idea, +1 for this one! –  Spook Jan 15 '13 at 17:22
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This problem is actually handled in VS-2012. Note that this test is disabled by default.

After enabling the warning you can instruct Vs to treat this particular warning as an error.

share|improve this answer
    
I always set warnings to be treated like errors. –  Michel Keijzers Jan 15 '13 at 14:27
    
It's good to know that. However, sometimes I might want on purpose to do something only if variable matches only a subset of enum's values. (This should be noted explicitly in a comment near the code though) –  Spook Jan 15 '13 at 17:29
    
...except, that the warning you linked to is raised in C++ code, not C#... –  Spook Jan 16 '13 at 6:42
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  1. Yes
  2. That would be ideally to test.
  3. I don't know of a tool that can do it.
  4. The easiest way is to ALWAYS have a default clause. When the default should not do anything write something like:

    default:
        // No action required
        break;
    

    This way you the programmer at least thought about the left over items (if there are any).

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for default with comment, it's wise to inform about it (as well as intentionally not verifying all possible values of an enum). However, you provided no automated way of checking, if all programmers follow this path and that's precisely what I'm searching for... –  Spook Jan 15 '13 at 17:32
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