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I am new to programming, and I'm trying to teach myself what a StackOverflow is caused by. I played around with loops and caused the error, but a code for a forkbomb I tested doesn't cause the error. Why is this?

public class ForkBomb
{
  public static void main(String[] args) throws java.io.IOException 
  {
     while(true) 
    {
        Runtime.getRuntime().exec(new String[]{"java", "-cp", System.getProperty("java.class.path"), "ForkBomb"});
    }
  }
}

This doesn't cause a stack overflow. Why? Yet this causes one:

public class WhileBomb
{
   public WhileBomb()
   {
      while (true)
      {
      new WhileBomb();
      }
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) throws java.io.IOException
   {
     WhileBomb goodBye = new WhileBomb();
   }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Each thread gets its own stack. When you create a new process you also get a new thread and a new stack. A stack overflow error occurs when a single stack is filled, but you are creating many different stacks, none of which ever get full.

In the second example you only have one thread and you have a recursive call. Each time you call a method some information is temporarily stored on the stack until the method returns. Because your method never returns the stack will be consumed until you get a stack overflow exception.

You don't even need the while loop. This would also give a stack overflow exception:

public WhileBomb()
{
   new WhileBomb();
}
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I was too slow to answer, but as soon as the question is about 'destructive' programming, everyone feels to be spoken to.. :D –  Nippey Jan 15 '13 at 14:26
    
@Nippey Not to mention that it contains ample references to the name of our beloved forum. –  Agentlien Jan 15 '13 at 14:29
    
Thank you so much for the answer! Now if I only understood what a thread was, and how the forkbomb line works... –  user1901074 Jan 15 '13 at 14:51

The first example isn't adding anything to the stack, it's creating entirely new stacks. The second example, however, adds to the stack here:

public WhileBomb()
{
    while (true)
    {
        new WhileBomb();
    }
}

What you see here is an infinite recursion. Creating a WhileBomb object involves creating a WhileBomb object. This all happens in the same thread on the same program (not forking off a new one), so it's in the same stack. Each creation of a new WhileBomb within the thread adds another instance of itself to the stack.

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A stack overflow is caused by using more stack space than what is available. A fork bomb slows down the PC by spawning a large number of new processes, each of which keeps spawning yet more (and so on).

The reason a fork bomb doesn't cause a stack overflow is that each process has its own stack, and as such you are not actually using much stack space in any process, only creating many processes each with its own (relatively small) stack.

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